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Author Topic: Tagalog rap bashing rock?  (Read 8632 times)

Offline bakit?

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Re: Tagalog rap bashing rock?
« Reply #25 on: September 19, 2014, 12:40:22 PM »
IMHO, it has nothing to do with the complexity of being in a real band. If we're going that way might as well listen to The Roots - a full blown hip-hop band. They're not called legendary for nothing.

Hindi ko napanood yung vid but im sure it doesn't represent real hip-hop. I listened to rock before when I was in HS. And I can say it was a good phase.

Mind you "sampling" is more complex than one would think. Especially when using samples for different songs. Rapping is harder than it seems. They say its the modern sonnet. There are different aspects of it that can be studied.

Yes im the hip-hop kind of guy. But it doesn't mean i dislike rock. In fact I listen to some but not often.

Hell, real hip-hop even disses the hip-hop of today. Try your ears on some blackstar, mos def, talib kweli, lupe fiasco (food and liquor, the cool), the roots, immortal technique, blu, common, etc. and one would realize just how wide the topics/concepts are.

Drake? Flo rida? Plies? Souljah boy? Lil wayne?
Andrew E? Bullsh*t yan. They're more club music (jeep music for andrew E) than anything. Sorry sa mga nakikinig sa kanila pero yeah, i'd rather listen to farting sounds.

Gumagawa lang ng pangalan yan. Magsasayang ka lang ng oras kung papatulan. Might as well focus energy on practicing or what not. Peace and of course Amen!

There's only good sh*t and bad sh*t. For me at least.

krs one, saul williams, age francis, eyedea, zack dela rocha. these are real writers repping hip hop.

then there is the kind of hip hop thats watered down and superficial. the lil waynes and the gangster wannabes.

 its a war between the blings blings who glorify wealth and gangster culture vs the true hop heads who are socially conscious, aware and empowered.

i like krs one a lot, when he drops knowledge and pops wisdom. When he says you can love the hood but not poverty.

I like Saul Wiliams when he talks about gangsterism in a way that empowers black culture(and maybe brown) by comparing two slain rappers to the greatest minds in history.

I like it when sage francis talks about girls writing off the world in cursive.

There should be no genre division. There should be quality division.
« Last Edit: September 19, 2014, 12:42:32 PM by bakit? »
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Completely.

Offline marzi

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Re: Tagalog rap bashing rock?
« Reply #26 on: June 06, 2017, 10:31:24 AM »
Death Threat's Ilibing ng Buhay is a punchy, slap-in-yo-face rapping about the socialites or those pretending to be a part of the high society. I adored the song from the moment i heard it playing full blast on my friends panasonic karaoke from way back mid-90's. I was into pinoy rock at that time but my appreciation for the local hiphop was at the same level. Hanggang ngayon, hinahanap-hanap pa rin ng tenga ko yung mga ganung kantahan. Too bad i lost contact with the 'gangstas' in our place.
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