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The Musician Forums => Music Technology & Pro Audio => Topic started by: KitC on April 21, 2007, 01:29:47 PM

Title: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on April 21, 2007, 01:29:47 PM
Ok.... rather than set up a tutorial thread, let's make this into a Q & A sort of thread and the emphasis will be on setting up your PC regardless of the specs. Remember, however, that some pc configurations are not compatible with audio no matter what you do. Also remember that most pc's coming out today have a decided slant towards powerful video capabilities, something which often conflicts with glitch-free audio performance. If you are decided about great audio performance, you will have to give up great video performance (which means you will have to give up that 8800GTXProMillenium+1 and go for a considerably less powerful vidcard).

I know this thread will get unusually long so I will be adding to it as time progresses. Any pertinent info will be added to this initial post and I suggest that anyone posting new questions refer to this first post so we can avoid duplication.

Let's start...



One of the most important considerations when choosing a pc for recording happens to be not the pc, but the SOFTWARE.

Strange, but true. It is the software that determines what soundcard you will use, and what the minimum requirements are for running that software. Word of advice about minimum requirements... follow that and your pc/software combi will function, but just barely. You need to factor something like 150% of the minimum just to have something workable; so if the minimum cpu is 1 GHz, you really need at least 1.5 GHz to be able to do any real work... 200% to 300% of minimum is suggested.

Software also determines the platform you will use. Sonar, Audition, Wavelab and Soundforge are strictly pc while Logic, Digital Performer, Bias Peak and Soundhack are mac. ProTools, Cubase and Nuendo are dual-platform applications. Let's not turn this thread into a mac vs. pc thread because, in my view, these are nothing but tools... machines that are designed for a purpose. Each has it's strengths and weaknesses and I'd rather we concentrate on how we can maximize the usefulness of these tools. No mac vs. pc flame wars, get it?

Now that you've decided your software, if you do some digging into its feature, you will often find a list of compatible soundcards that go with it. Please, please choose a soundcard with a known compatibility. If you decide to use that cheap 300 peso CMI soundcard or USB cdrking sound dongle, your on your own. I have nothing against using inexpensive gear but often you will find that support is sometimes non-existent or that drivers are POS and are hardly updated. To add insult to injury, the performance of these cheap cards are often not up to par and sound quality often suffers. You CAN use these cards (I did not say you can't), but you will have to work extra hard to get even demo quality sound from them so if you decide to go that route, don't forget that I told you so. I have used soundblaster cards early in my delvings into digital audio and over the years, my ears have become attuned to what they can do well, and what they cannot. I will say that blasters are good for learning the craft.

Now, finally, the pc...

So you got your software and you've chosen your soundcard... now what? Put it all in that pre-assembled pc and then click on that record button in your software and hope you nail that perfect take? NOT!

Most pre-assembled pcs skimp on some important very important parts like the motherboard, ram, vidcard, power supply... you name it. Even Dells are guilty of this fact plus, pre-assembleds are more tuned towards office applications and the occasional game or 2. Audio pcs are a different breed. Audio pcs eschew 3D video performance in favor of increased audio capability. Capabilities like low latency, high track counts, quiet operation and very good 2D screen redraw performance (playback of movie videos is also a consideration for post production suites).

Some soundcards are also picky about the motherboard chipset. Research well on the chipsets that go with your soundcard. You don't want a repeat of that Via debacle that happened with soundblasters. Via chipsets starting with the KT166 were horrible with computer audio; it was only with the K8T800 Pro chipset that Via redeemed itself. Intel chipsets were stable with the i865 chipset, but the i915 and i925 were disappointing for some; the present 975XBX and 965P chipsets are proving to be very good performers. Nforce chipsets were quite good up to Nforce3, the Nforce4 was a disappointment plus the combination of pcie proved to be a real problem. If you already have chosen your software, it pays to lurk in their user forums since they often post which motherboards work well - that's how I happened to choose my present day N3 mobo.

So what does this mean for most pc-based platforms? DIY systems are the way to go. You get to choose your own parts and you can most likely get the best and most compatible components for your needs. At times you can save a lot by going DIY but you then have the responsibility of installing the OS, tweaking it for audio  and installing all the software and hardware; a process that can take 2 or 3 days at least. Mac users have it easy, their machines just work out of the box but they have to pay for that ease of use (I call it the 2:1 ratio but lets not go into that).

There are lots more to discuss but let's take it one step at a time.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: stilljey on April 22, 2007, 04:04:55 AM
thanks sir kit 2 ur wonderful n gracious tips, so if i decide to have protools as my software, i compulsary upgrade my processor from P4 to Core Duo? (base on what i read sa forum na ito, whewww....!! ang haba nga eh way back 2006..enjoy naman) and what soundcard do you prefer for PT.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on April 22, 2007, 04:13:00 AM
thanks sir kit 2 ur wonderful n gracious tips, so if i decide to have protools as my software, i compulsary upgrade my processor from P4 to Core Duo? (base on what i read sa forum na ito, whewww....!! ang haba nga eh way back 2006..enjoy naman) and what soundcard do you prefer for PT.

PT is a closed system. You cannot use any soundcard other than Digidesign hardware for PT HD systems and PT LE, or M-Audio cards for PT M-Powered. If you want to experiment with PT Free, it only works with Win 98/ME only.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jaime on April 22, 2007, 05:27:52 AM
suggestions about which PC sound card will be good enough to be able connect my mixer with RCA I/O to my pc? budget 3 to 4K pesoses. i used my PC stock sound card before with the 1/8" but nasira na kaka suksuk hatak ko nung 1/8 jack. better yata ang RCA, wachhathink?
PM nng po sir KIT TY
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: nicolle on April 22, 2007, 08:15:53 AM
hi, Sir KitC!

do you have an office? i was thinking if it is possible for us to request for a hands-on demo on how to set up our pc for recording...a lot of postings are too complicated for me...it would be easier if i watch how you do it....

thanks a lot!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on April 22, 2007, 10:43:29 AM
@ jaime - if you look around the classifieds, you might be able to grab a deal on a very good soundcard like M-Audio. The M-Audio 2496 is a very good card for the money although brand new cards will set you back twice your intended budget, it comes standard with RCA I/O (note that the s/pdif digital connections are RCA also). A very good alternative is the Behringer UCA202 which is USB2 and has RCA I/O but it is usually bundled with other Behri products. Someone is offering the Behri FCA202 which is a firewire equivalent of the UCA; if your pc has firewire, I recommend this card but there are a few caveats about onboard firewire, namely, Via firewire chipsets on most mobos are notorious for poor handling of audio so be forewarned.

An alternative to your 1/8" problem is to fashion some 'adapter' plugs, sort of like a mini patchbay. Most electronics stores carry stereo 1/8" to mono RCA y-cables; I suggest connecting these semi-permanently to your soundcard and just use the rca connections as your 'point-of-contact' with other gear like mixers - just add rca to 1/4" adapters if needed. It's much cheaper to replace these y-cables than a soundcard.

@nicolle - my 'office' is a midi project studio which sorta resides in my bedroom, the end result of downsizing on gear and the direct result of going virtual. There are plans of relocating to a place more conducive for visitors, so to speak. I can, however, set up a sort of demo in collaboration with BAMF at his studio over at Sto. Domingo. PM me your location and maybe we can figure something out.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: nicolle on April 24, 2007, 03:26:05 AM
@ jaime - if you look around the classifieds, you might be able to grab a deal on a very good soundcard like M-Audio. The M-Audio 2496 is a very good card for the money although brand new cards will set you back twice your intended budget, it comes standard with RCA I/O (note that the s/pdif digital connections are RCA also). A very good alternative is the Behringer UCA202 which is USB2 and has RCA I/O but it is usually bundled with other Behri products. Someone is offering the Behri FCA202 which is a firewire equivalent of the UCA; if your pc has firewire, I recommend this card but there are a few caveats about onboard firewire, namely, Via firewire chipsets on most mobos are notorious for poor handling of audio so be forewarned.

An alternative to your 1/8" problem is to fashion some 'adapter' plugs, sort of like a mini patchbay. Most electronics stores carry stereo 1/8" to mono RCA y-cables; I suggest connecting these semi-permanently to your soundcard and just use the rca connections as your 'point-of-contact' with other gear like mixers - just add rca to 1/4" adapters if needed. It's much cheaper to replace these y-cables than a soundcard.

@nicolle - my 'office' is a midi project studio which sorta resides in my bedroom, the end result of downsizing on gear and the direct result of going virtual. There are plans of relocating to a place more conducive for visitors, so to speak. I can, however, set up a sort of demo in collaboration with BAMF at his studio over at Sto. Domingo. PM me your location and maybe we can figure something out.

hi!

thanks a lot...maybe the demo at BAMF studio at Sto. Domingo would be fine for a start.  is there a fee?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: redcomet_m on April 24, 2007, 03:44:10 PM
@nicole

well, i believe Master KitC is a very reasonable man to negotiate with nicole, im sure you could work something out

So to continue KitC's insightful narratives, lets start with memory. If you have the budget get maximum memory that youre mobo can handle although i doubt it will help since the program is 32bit and XP is 32bit unless you work on a 64bit OS and 64bit proc. Id suggest dual core proc as it helps with real time performance.

With regards to hard drives, do simple but clean disk management. Its better to have a system drive, a programs drive and a project/files drive. Disk size is upto you since you have the money not me. But id do settle for a huuuugggeeee project/files drive because all of the biggest data will be handled there. And it doubles as a swap disk to so...oh and get the latest i believe its sata.

Externals are ok but even FW800 cannot match SATA II perf unless youre the mobile type.

Graphics card...hmm do we need that? I dunno, can onboard grpx handle sound editing. Maybe KitC has an answer.

Now thats PC users, Mac users...buy an IMAC, external drive and external audio interface and your done :) if you could, boost your memory. Thats all folks
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on April 24, 2007, 05:21:40 PM
Very nice insights, redcomet!

I'd like to add that although XP is a 32-bit OS, most (if not all) audio programs in the windows platform still operate at 32 bit with the exception of Sonar which is 64-bit ready. In terms of RAM, this mean the OS can only address a maximum of 4 gigs (actually 3.2 gig addressable) and you have to use the 3 gig 'switch' because XP only recognizes 2 gig by default. Does this mean the end of the world for audio usage? No. Because unless you are streaming huge samples from ram, 2 gigs is actually more than enough. One can actually work at 512 megs, but you will have to trim down the amount of background services so that you gain more ram real estate.

About SATA drives... early motherboard implementation of sata often caused problems with audio devices. This is because of how the host controller interface 'sat' on top of the pci bus allowing the drive to communicate with the entire system. The Nforce2 mobos were a 'victim' of this implementation that's why it was often recommended to go PATA with Nforce2. Present day mobos don't suffer from this design quirk
anymore.

I'd go with redcomet's advice on having a separate system and data drive. Not a single drive partitioned into 2 drives, but 2 physical drives. Also have some means of storing data. Right now, cdr's are the safest bet but use known media. Writable dvds are becoming popular as a storage medium but there are reports that these don't hold data as long as cdr's. When in doubt, use branded media manufactured by a reputable firm. (There are branded fakes, however, like branded TDK's and Verbatims but when you go into the manufacturing details, these were often manufactured by a particular taiwanese firm/s. They're easy to spot since they're so cheap.... And stay away from generics!)

Graphics? Decide early on if you're building a gaming machine or an audio workstation since high end video cards are notorious for stealing all available processing bandwidth. Onboard graphics are becoming more powerful, but they often share onboard ram and they sometimes have limited resolutions, like you may have a 19" monitor but if your graphics can only do 1024 x 800, that's simply a waste of monitor real estate. You will want higher resolutions if you want to see more of your work. Interestingly, going multiple monitors is increasingly becoming the standard way of working as it allows you to have a track view on one screen and a console/mixer view on the other - a very efficient way of working sometimes. One more thing, audio applications DO NOT need flashy 3D graphics capabilities but often require very good 2D performance; Matrox vidcards are often good in this regard.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: redcomet_m on April 24, 2007, 07:32:15 PM
thanks sir kit

ive searched among the plethora of local websites and ive summed up the items indicated and came up with a conservative estimate. The CPU alone will cost you round 40k-ish. pretty decent so here are the candidates:

2.16GHZ core2duo:     11500
gigabyte 965GM-S2:      7400
GEIL 2GB PC-533:         7000
Seagate   160x2:          6000
                 320:             5000
INNO3D GT 7300LE:      2300


total:   39K smackers

Again this is pretty conservative, you could still trim this down if you decide to settle for Pentium D or AMD AM2, or get one IDE DISK so you would have enough leg room to buy a new monitor if you dont want to use your ol' crappy crt monitor. Man sarap magbuo :) though my purpose is very much different than this, pegging my choice around 55k, i felt that pro audio and pro graphics isnt that very far apart in terms of budgeting a workstation.

Anyway, we could still argue on this since there might be issues.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on April 26, 2007, 11:54:45 AM
Nice specs!

Is that an E6400? You might want to check out the E6x20 series as well as the E4420. From what I've been reading lately, these are going to be priced quite close to the existing E6x00 series and will feature larger L2 cache, which also means that the older 6x00 should be experiencing a price drop! This is a good time to go C2D.

The Gigabyte is a nice board but has only 2 pci slots. I tend to favor at least 3 pci slots especially if your soundcards are still pci based. If you are using firewire, get a TI-based firewire card since most onboard firewire is based on the problematic Via chipset. Gigabyte, I believe, uses TI firewire chips but I've read about some lower end Gigabyte mobos that do not, so YMMV. The Gigabyte P965-DS3 is a good 3-slot mobo; don't confuse it with the DS3P mobo which eschews one pci slot in favor of another 16x pcie slot, an allusion to dual video Crossfire support.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: bindoy on April 26, 2007, 12:01:02 PM
peace redcomet_m  pls see PM..gbu
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: redcomet_m on April 26, 2007, 01:08:41 PM
Youre right Kit, prices of these chips will definitely go down since AMD will release new native  quad core that will compete with intels quad, although AMD will first release Server type chips, news like these shake the proc industry. If the new AMD chips perform as it should, we could possibly anticipate intel upping the ante by releasing much smaller and faster chips, and if that happens, who knows, we might see quad core chips priced at say...20-24k.

The only downside is if they change the slots of the mobos, but thats a different issue.

Hmm 2 pci slots...well i would like em clean and lean but anyway its just a matter of preference and consider the size of audiocards(professional) that youll insert. You would want to put some distance between em and the Vid card. Its always good to let those things breathe.

Anyway regarding PC wirefire, im always finnicky on them on-board firewire. Id rather have something 3rd party like SIIG or ADS PYRO, but theyre pricey and hard to find locally.

To add, i didnt include a power supply, i dunno if 300watts is enough, though based on experiece id buy a decent powersupply paired with a reliable UPS. So maybe 10k more on that prized estimate
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: xjepoyx on April 26, 2007, 01:16:31 PM
AMD Quads will be release in Socket F format. It'll take a few more months before they release the AM2 versions of AMD Barcelona.

Re: PSU's Dual Cores and specially Quad Cores... YOU NEED more than 500watts.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on April 26, 2007, 01:45:05 PM
jplacson mentioned you can find Lacie FW cards at Mac stores. I'm not exactly sure if they're TI chipsets but Lacie's tend to be reliable.

I was looking prices for the E4300 and was pleased to find them already in the P6k range with the E6320 already listed at P9k. The New Barcelona core will definitely make dual core prices drop and maybe even Intel's QX cores will plunge soon. Pretty soon, somebody will be making 16-core cpus that will give rise to the T1000 Terminator. (Ah'll be bahk!  8-) )

I long for those days when pci cards like the Aardvard were shielded from internal EMI and RFI, looks like external is the way to go. For sheer track count, pci is still the game in town; I just wonder why it's taking manufacturers a long time to make pcie versions... I predict the next NAMM or Musik Messe  will bring out pcie flavors of soundcards. My guess, though, is that pcie performance is really slanted towards video which is why audio manufacturers are slow in putting out pcie soundcards and mostly concentrating on FW and USB2.0 versions; less hassle in trying to fight head on with video.

As for onboard FW? It seems RME have done a good job adapting their Fireface 800/400 to Via firewire but like all things with Via and audio, YMMV. I'd rather go the safe route and get a TI chipset anytime. AFAIK, the Gigabyte mobos usually feature TI firewire chipsets, one of the reasons the Gigabytes are so appealing to me; got my sights set on their P965-DS3 or DQ6 (which is 2 slots but I researched its IRQ allocations already), my other alternative is the Asus P5B Deluxe or even the P5B-E (I much rather prefer the P5WDH though). A dark horse in the running is the DFI Infinity P965 Dark-S which is quite inexpensive; although more known for gaming, DFI boards have very good overclocking potential plus it has 3 pci slots. A much darker horse is the Asus Commando RoG P965 mobo which has 4  :-o pci slots! This mobo is decidedly built for gaming so I can't comment on how well it will mesh with audio. Tempting though...

Get a 500W branded PSU, you won't regret it. I have a CM 350W PSU and a HEC 500W, my present A64 3200+ MSI Neo2 Plat behaves much better at 500 watts than at 350, and that's with 2 drives and 2 soundcards (Emu 1820m and DSP Factory). The new C2D are recommended at 500w to begin with.

UPS are a necessity now. A sudden blackout the other day made it clear how lucky i was to have my APC. Even a battery backup will do; I use the APC ES500 and it has saved me thru a lot of power outages - my hard disks love me for it..
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on April 26, 2007, 01:53:25 PM
Jepoy! Hay nako! Another socket in the mix... :roll: I wonder what Socket G, H, I... and Z will look like (Socket Z feat. 1M pinless, cube-core design with liquid nitrogen cooling :lol: ).
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: xjepoyx on April 26, 2007, 10:08:13 PM
Jepoy! Hay nako! Another socket in the mix... :roll: I wonder what Socket G, H, I... and Z will look like (Socket Z feat. 1M pinless, cube-core design with liquid nitrogen cooling :lol: ).

uu nga eh! GAS Attack na naman to malamang! hehehe
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: stanley on April 29, 2007, 05:08:31 AM
sir kit, give me an overview of how a raw material( after ma record sa track ) goes to finish product, produce good dynamic processing. i dont have any hardware effects, mga plug-ins ang gamit ko.
 
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on April 29, 2007, 10:32:58 AM
stanley,

Seeing as this thread is for setting up a pc recording solution, it would be better if you started a new thread or maybe even just read through some of the previous threads. Your scenario is usually called In-The-Box (ITB) mixing by some publications and a lot of people work in that manner and produce good results. The subject is very broad, however, and it will easily take up quite a few pages. Have a look through the Tweakheadz guides, especially the part on mixing (http://tweakheadz.com/perfect_mix.html) and surf on over to the Bruce A. Miller Audio Course (http://bruceamiller.us/bamaudioschool_com/index.html) (don't worry, it's free). Also, try to get some copies of Mix, Recording, Sound on Sound, and other music publications since they often have articles on mixing and mastering.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: stanley on May 03, 2007, 02:10:22 AM
thank u Master Kit,  got it , also i have some Recording Magz
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: bindoy on May 03, 2007, 09:55:33 AM
stanley,

Seeing as this thread is for setting up a pc recording solution, it would be better if you started a new thread or maybe even just read through some of the previous threads. Your scenario is usually called In-The-Box (ITB) mixing by some publications and a lot of people work in that manner and produce good results. The subject is very broad, however, and it will easily take up quite a few pages. Have a look through the Tweakheadz guides, especially the part on [/url=http://tweakheadz.com/perfect_mix.html]mixing[/url] and surf on over to the Bruce A. Miller Audio Course (http://bruceamiller.us/bamaudioschool_com/index.html) (don't worry, it's free). Also, try to get some copies of Mix, Recording, Sound on Sound, and other music publications since they often have articles on mixing and mastering.

salamat po dito sir kitC...grabe...malaking tulong to....gbu
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: stanley on May 04, 2007, 04:20:57 AM
Sir Kit C, i see that u are a Sonar guy also, what is best and compatible soundcard/interface to my Sonar 6, yung affordable he-he-he.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on May 04, 2007, 10:09:21 AM
Sir Kit C, i see that u are a Sonar guy also, what is best and compatible soundcard/interface to my Sonar 6, yung affordable he-he-he.

I would like to say that I seem to have gravitated more towards Sonar recently simply because it's midi features were what I found to be compatible with the way I work; I've no qualms about using other DAW software since their functionalities are similar anyway.

I have had success using soundblasters with Sonar, if affordable is foremost in your requirements. The M-Audio 2496 is also quite stable with the added bonus that it lets you use PT MP. As long as you are not simultaneously multitracking more than 2 channels, these 2 cards will definitely do the job. Soundblasters have an added bonus in that they use soundfonts natively, but you can download rgcaudio's sfz, a free soundfont player if you decide on something other than a 'blaster.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: stanley on May 05, 2007, 04:04:12 AM
tenks a lot Sir Kit.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on May 06, 2007, 11:08:50 AM
Welcome, Stanley.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: Boddhisattva on May 08, 2007, 08:05:50 AM
Kit,

I bought an Emu 1212 and have been using it since last month just for listening (not yet for recording). One time I tried to use Sonar LE, the bundled software and I realized that it wouldn't sound off midi files because there was no softsynth installed. 3650guy tried to help me install his softsynth but we were not successful.  Any tips?

WENDEL
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on May 08, 2007, 09:44:02 AM
Wendel,

Since the Emu has no onboard soundfont synth, you could use the Roland TTS-1 built into Sonar (does the LE version have it?). Load the tutorial, open the DXi rack and load TTS-1, then assign all midi tracks to TTS-1.

You can 'fool' Sonar into making it default to using using the first softsynth it loads by making sure NO MIDI OUTPUT DEVICES are activated or highlighted in Midi Options. Now, whenever you load a tutorial then load TTS-1, all midi tracks will be assigned to the softsynth. This behavior will be lost whenever you activate a midi output port in Midi Options, however. If you need to have permanent hardware midi output configuration, esp. if you have a lot of midi ports, just create a template project file with TTS-1 (or whatever softsynth you have) already loaded and pre-assigned to midi tracks.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: Boddhisattva on May 08, 2007, 10:43:33 AM
Teynks Kit. Tagal na natin di nagkikita.

Bought the 1212 for 150$. Good deal na, no?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: stratman1 on May 08, 2007, 12:50:17 PM
Anyone used UAD-1 here? Comments?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on May 08, 2007, 01:13:25 PM
Teynks Kit. Tagal na natin di nagkikita.

Bought the 1212 for 150$. Good deal na, no?

Very good deal, Wendel. Sayang lang you missed out on their $99 sale. did you get the newer v2 version? you can tell its v2 if it has no firewire port. were you able to configure it properly? kung medyo nahihilo ka na sa patchmix, just give me a call.

@stratman1 - try PMing or calling starfugger. she's a known UAD user.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: Boddhisattva on May 08, 2007, 01:25:24 PM
Double yata price ng 1212 dito. No firewire port so it must be a v2. I missed out on the 120$ sale, pero ok pa rin. Nakakahilo nga patchmix, but I'll give it a try. I'll call you if I'm unsuccessful.

Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on May 08, 2007, 01:39:31 PM
You know the secret to patchmix? Just think of the sends as audio patchcords to sound application. Asio sends route audio to asio driven applications while the lone wave send is for wdm/directsound applications. If you want to keep your outputs simple, just have a single wave and asio output strip, and that's it!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: stanley on May 09, 2007, 04:08:32 AM
Sir kit.   can a Soundblaster for Sonar give a professional sound result.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on May 09, 2007, 10:33:13 AM
Sir kit.   can a Soundblaster for Sonar give a professional sound result.

If you mean truly professional, no. It's the soundcard's analog-to-digital converters that are important for professional sounding results. Soundblaster's typically use consumer oriented parts (translated: low cost) which often have passable performance, and their clocks have a relatively high amount of jitter in comparison with cards dedicated to recording. The first thing you will notice when going from a soundblaster to a 'pro' card is lower noise floor, better stereo imaging and more detail.

Does this mean you can't record with a blaster? No. You can make demo quality recordings with it. If your recording is mostly midi/softsynths/soundfonts with minimal audio recording, the soundblaster will fit that bill very well.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: stanley on May 10, 2007, 04:36:26 AM
Yes sir kit, most of my recordings are midi, softsynth from roland and cakewalk TTS, i use Reason rewire for drums, ang audio recording ko lang ay sa vocal and guitar. sir kindly explain 2 me the soundcard analog 2 digital converter, and what type of soundcard/brand that give a "pro" sound result. GBU.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on May 10, 2007, 10:46:09 AM
Lets start with the input side, the A/D converters. Very good cards usually have a very high signal to noise ratio (SNR), allowing you to accurately capture detail at very low volumes; important when you want to capture very dynamic performances without capturing circuit noise along with it. Movement of electrons in a circuit always generates noise and high quality components and very good circuit design minimize this noise. Consumer soundcards were not designed for audio capture in the first place; they were designed mainly for playback and often are optimized to deload a cpu during gaming. That's right, a soundblaster is designed to give you better framerates for your favorite games.

Pro soundcards also have the ability to capture at high sample rates, very important for detail esp. in the high frequencies. One more thing, drivers are essential with a pro soundcard. Creative asio drivers often have poor audio recording performance that's why enthusiasts (like kxproject) have developed drivers with better performance - it will not overstep the soundblaster's converters, however.

On the output side, consumer cards were meant for ADEQUATE playback performance; the ordinary consumer will not hear detail that most pro cards are capable of. Why is detail important? When you are mixing music, it is supposed to be played back from a lowly mp3 player up to seriously audiophile hifi speakers. Guess what kind of speakers the critics and reviewers usually own. You also want the soundcard to reproduce faithfully what was recorded.

What soundcard will give a pro sounding result? That's not so easy to answer as all will state that theirs give professional results; consult published and online reviews so you can make an educated decision.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: stanley on May 10, 2007, 03:26:19 PM
very well said, if i decide 2 go for pro soundcard/interface, my sequencer should also be replace bcause of compatibility, ganun  ba sir?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: spazzkid on May 11, 2007, 01:29:22 AM
very well said, if i decide 2 go for pro soundcard/interface, my sequencer should also be replace bcause of compatibility, ganun  ba sir?
if youre using reason, FL, cubase, etc for sequencing theres no need to replace it as it will support a higher end soundcard/interface.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: stanley on May 12, 2007, 02:53:57 AM
ok tenks sir Kit & spazz.., aside from MAudio 2496, any other interface na compatible sa Sonar,  then later to go on online review.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: spazzkid on May 12, 2007, 03:47:38 AM
if youre on a really tight budget, theres a usb audio interface yung "behringer uca202" which is cheap and would suffice for your needs. i think they go for around 2.5k+, it should work on any DAW or Sequencer.  :-D
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jv21 on May 12, 2007, 06:59:30 AM
sir kitz, to be more specific, pde po b kaung magbigay ng example ng isang magandang pc set up? or kau ba sir ano po gmet nyo? anong soundcard, speaker, processor, etc..


tnx a lot!

Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on May 12, 2007, 11:17:15 AM
sir kitz, to be more specific, pde po b kaung magbigay ng example ng isang magandang pc set up? or kau ba sir ano po gmet nyo? anong soundcard, speaker, processor, etc..

past systems include:

pentium 166 mmx (upped to 233) with 64 megs sram, Intel 430 tx, soundblaster awe32 and sblive, cakewalk PA8
athlon xp 1700+ asus A7n266vm, 256 megs ddr, sblive from previous system, Sonar 4 & Cubase SL2
sempron 2600+ msi k7n2 delta ilsr, 512 megs geil ddr, terratec dmx 6fire & sblive, Sonar 4 & Cubase SL2

present system: msi k8n neo2 platinum, athlon64 3200+, 512 megs geil, emu 1820m yamaha dsp factory 2416, Sonar 4PE 5PE 6PE, Project 5 V2, Cubase SL2, Samplitude V8 SE, Cubase VST 5.1, EmulatorX V1.5

future planned system: core 2 duo (maybe 4300 muna) based on gigabyte ga965P dq6
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: gjuanengo on May 12, 2007, 12:27:08 PM
(Being the Geek that I am, I would Like to contribute)

Setting up a DAW.

1. Start with the components, always try to get the components with the LOWEST LATENCY possible; that includes ram my boys. (Not only do gamers need fast ram, so do DAWS)

2. Start with no less than 1GB of ram, you'll need the buffer space. I have 2GB in my machine and sometimes it does run low when doing heavy processing.

3. Get a RAID array. RAID 0 for speed on your main drive (i.e. the system drive) to speed up disk activity and will help take some stress of the ram. Remember, the faster the data gets into the disk, the better. (since it takes the stress off the RAM)

4. QUIET COOLING. Youre running an audio station, you need silence. Dont go with generic fans, try to get fans with fluid bearings or dual ball bearings at the very least. (Panaflo gans win here) and try to get big fans that turn slower, since the pump out the same amount or more air at less noise.

5. Setup your BIOS properly. Turn off shadowing, as this improves performance for games, adds more latency to other devices (i.e. PCI BUS, which takes the heat for audio).

6. Disable devices that you dont use, less devices equals more processing power free for use.

7. Turn off fancy graphics. The less graphics your screen has to display, the more ram and processor power you have free for more important tasks.

8. Turn off system sounds and alerts. same reason.

9. Try to get components with the LEAST amount of onboard convenience. (i.e. onboard video is a no-no, it runs the processing through the CPU before the VGA. Onboard sound is also a no-no,  youre using a high-end or at least an upgrade card, you dont need audio)

10. Place the Sound card/device on the FARTHEST pci slot available, this distances it from the video card (which does produce quite a lot of noise) and keeps it isolated from the noisier devices up in that region of the mobo.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on May 12, 2007, 02:33:38 PM
Nice points, gjuanengo, but I'd like to point out a couple of things:

Raid is nice to have for fast HD throughput, but not entirely necessary for audio unless you are streaming loads of samples from HD or your magnum opus is already 120 tracks of 24/96 audio and counting. Video has a higher demand on HD throughput so a raid array is much more needed there. What is completely necessary is having more than 1 drive in your daw. I commonly have 1 drive for system and at least 1 drive for audio data (2 is preferable for backup purposes). I also backup important data to cd or dvd, but the jury is still out on how long data can be archived to these media.

Placing the audio card on the farthest slot is ok IF that slot isn't sharing an IRQ with video, which most motherboards commonly do. What better is to refer to the mobo manual and the IRQ allocation tables which sometimes indicate which slot isn't sharing an IRQ with any onboard device. IF there is no IRQ tble, then you will have to do that manually by swapping slots until the soundcard gets it's own unshared IRQ. Geeky stuff, I know, but necessary if you want your recording pc to be glitch-free.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jv21 on May 12, 2007, 02:58:32 PM
tnx for the info guys..

may kilala po b kaung pdeng mag-tutor sa kin personally sa pag set up ng hardwares for home recording? tnx.. (please quote me na din po how much will it cost me to have a tutor..

philmusic rocks!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: pipo on May 12, 2007, 11:21:12 PM
ok tenks sir Kit & spazz.., aside from MAudio 2496, any other interface na compatible sa Sonar,  then later to go on online review.

^^^ako din mga bossing.sana yung available locally and affordable with great performance.
meron bang EDIROL dito saten?ok yung power studio 25 eh.

tnx mga masters! :lol:
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on May 12, 2007, 11:32:20 PM
^^^ako din mga bossing.sana yung available locally and affordable with great performance.
meron bang EDIROL dito saten?ok yung power studio 25 eh.

tnx mga masters! :lol:

Unfortunately, walang local distro ng  Cakewalk products unless you count your local cdrom vendor.  :| Cakewalk's Power Studio 25 is merely Edirol's UA-25 packaged with Cakewalk's Sonar Studio Edition.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: gjuanengo on May 13, 2007, 12:30:29 AM
Nice points, gjuanengo, but I'd like to point out a couple of things:

Raid is nice to have for fast HD throughput, but not entirely necessary for audio unless you are streaming loads of samples from HD or your magnum opus is already 120 tracks of 24/96 audio and counting. Video has a higher demand on HD throughput so a raid array is much more needed there. What is completely necessary is having more than 1 drive in your daw. I commonly have 1 drive for system and at least 1 drive for audio data (2 is preferable for backup purposes). I also backup important data to cd or dvd, but the jury is still out on how long data can be archived to these media.

Placing the audio card on the farthest slot is ok IF that slot isn't sharing an IRQ with video, which most motherboards commonly do. What better is to refer to the mobo manual and the IRQ allocation tables which sometimes indicate which slot isn't sharing an IRQ with any onboard device. IF there is no IRQ tble, then you will have to do that manually by swapping slots until the soundcard gets it's own unshared IRQ. Geeky stuff, I know, but necessary if you want your recording pc to be glitch-free.

Hence me saying to disable all the other unused devices. This frees up IRQs.

Also, my mobo (and all the previous ones) are VIA powered Asus boards, quite good latency wise.

And the onboard raid controller is quite nice, hardly touches the processor.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on May 13, 2007, 01:34:05 AM

Hence me saying to disable all the other unused devices. This frees up IRQs.


In some ways, yes, this works however most present-day mobos 'hardwire' specific IRQs to specific slots to specific devices. Mobo designers and manufacturers assume that most consumers of their mobos will most likely use onboard devices rather than buy an expansion card, and the designers are usually right. Unfortunately, DAW users only represent a very small percentage of overall mobo users so I don't see a DAW specific mobo being designed any time soon.

Often, you will find USB and 1394 controllers sharing IRQs with specific slots; unfortunately most peripherals are usb-based while audio interfaces come in usb2/firewire flavors. Sometimes even raid controllers share an IRQ with a particular slot. With AGP/5 pci-slot mobos, you will often find that slots 1 and 5 share an IRQ with the AGP slot, that's why it's often not advisable to place the soundcard in the farthest slot from the vidcard. With PCIe, IRQ allocation becomes a different ballgame altogether. As main moderator at Productionforums.com, I often encounter IRQ sharing issues with pcie-based mobos often exacerbated by ACPI's handling of IRQ assignments.

Used to be you could assign an IRQ to a particular pci slot but modern BIOSes don't allow that anymore. Disabling unused ports like COM and LPT ports will not necessarily free up an IRQ for your soundcard because of the nature of their 'hardwiring' design, but will free up precious cpu cycles.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: pipo on May 13, 2007, 12:23:06 PM
sir yung "m-audio fast track usb" sa jb music?
6.8k sya.ok po ba sound & performance nun?
or any other alternatives/suggestions?

tnx. :-)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on May 13, 2007, 01:00:39 PM
sir yung "m-audio fast track usb" sa jb music?
6.8k sya.ok po ba sound & performance nun?
or any other alternatives/suggestions?

tnx. :-)

It's ok for an interface; I haven't heard anything bad about it - it now comes with 32-bit vista drivers too. Nice price considering it costs $129 list (good show, JB!) Note that it doesn't do midi just in case you require a midi connection. As for other alternatives, not much in terms of usb audio interfaces locally, but quite a lot abroad if you intend to acquire from there.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jose roberto on June 01, 2007, 09:01:46 AM
Woohooo! A thread dedicated for PC Recording!  :-)

A few questions, of course  :-D

I want to record my songs on my PC, what do I do. A blow by blow account would be wonderful.  :-)
where do I plug my guitar/amp/effects on the PC?  I have an Adobe Audtion 1.5, is it good as a basic music recording software? I want to lay down bass, drums, keyboards (or even horns!) on the guitar tracks, is it possible without having these instruments at my disposal? (the Audition has them  :-D). any reply would be highly appreciated. Thanks.


here is my current( humble) PC set up

AMD Athlon XP 2000+
Asus A7V8X-X mobo ( S/PDIF, USB inputs)
1 Gb DDR 333Mhz Ram
128mb Asus FX5200 Videocard
40Gb WD HDD 5400 rpm
NEC DVD WRITER
1394 PCI Firewire card

My music rig set up
Ibanez AR250
Crate GX-40C
KORG G1


Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on June 01, 2007, 09:48:36 AM
I want to record my songs on my PC, what do I do. A blow by blow account would be wonderful.  :-)
where do I plug my guitar/amp/effects on the PC?

jose roberto,

Judging from your pc specs, you didn't mention a soundcard so I assume your pc has onboard sound. While you can record using onboard sound, remember that it is bound by the following limitations:

a. Not-so-great sound quality. Motherboards are built to a price specification and sound often takes a backseat  so don't expect high quality converters here. There will he higher noise levels and the line in usually doubles as part of the 5.1 or 7.1 output so operation of the inputs is a compromise.

b. Limited sample rate capability. It's either 44.1 or 48 kHz... 96 kHz? Forget it! Plus, if the mobo has s/pdif, it's almost always an output operating at 48 kHz ONLY.

c. Analog I/O is in 1/8" stereo jacks. Not the most robust of connections plus these are prone to component failures when repeatedly inserting and removing the plugs; this is due to the way the sockets are soldered onto the board. You can get around this by making a sort of 'breakout' extension cable that puts the strain of repeated removal and insertions (necessary when you have a lot of gear but only one pair of inputs) on the breakout. Some use a small mixer to act as a breakout.

That said, get a good soundcard if you want to sound better. Better yet, get a soundcard designed for audio recording. Soundblasters are a good place to start but are not really meant for serious recording, but will do for demos. The M-Audio brand is very good for recording and has a range to suit most budgets.

I'm not sure if you can plug your G1 direct since I can't find any reference to it on the net. I'm sure it was meant for direct connection to an amp; if it has a designated line out, you can plug that into your mixer/soundcard. If in doubt, use it's headphone connection instead, but watch out for levels!

To do a blow-by-blow here might make this post inordinately too long, but the short of it is to connect your signals to your inputs and to watch out for levels! If it's too loud, reduce volume at the source, not at the soundcard input. Another thing to consider is how you are monitoring (or listening) to what is coming into your soundcard; whats the point of recording if you can't hear it? Again, if you are still relying on onboard sound, remember the old computer axiom, G-I-G-O.

Sign up for the PC Recording workshop we have planned for the 9th. You might learn a trick or 2.

Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: stilljey on June 01, 2007, 05:22:06 PM
mag sign-up ka na bro.  sulit ito para sa ating mga baguhan... 8-).....dalawa na lang.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jose roberto on June 02, 2007, 10:34:08 AM
Thanks a lot, sir KitC!  :-)

I got a basic creative PCI soundcard. I am still thinking if I need to buy a M-audio soundcard ( I am just doing demos).

Checking out my specs, i got this small stereo jack already for my soundcard inputs(analog). The Crate Amp has a line out input at the back. The G1 has a line out/phone input. For the monitoring situation, do I need to buy a 5.1 speaker system (my board has 5.1 capabilities) or the basic 2.1 would do? Again, thanks for the responses  :-)

about the PC recording workshop, what are the details? salamat :-)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on June 02, 2007, 11:40:43 AM

Checking out my specs, i got this small stereo jack already for my soundcard inputs(analog). The Crate Amp has a line out input at the back. The G1 has a line out/phone input. For the monitoring situation, do I need to buy a 5.1 speaker system (my board has 5.1 capabilities) or the basic 2.1 would do? Again, thanks for the responses  :-)

about the PC recording workshop, what are the details? salamat :-)

You might say I'm quite familiar with the Creative card's capabilities and they are quite capable of making good demos. As a matter of fact, I seem to have made more of my original music on a soundblaster than with what I have now. Go figure....   If your equipment has line level outputs, it should interface ok with the soundcard's line level inputs.

Do you need a 5.1 system? Only if the format you are going to deliver to a client is 5.1, until then, stereo is still the most common format. Get a good set of monitors. I can't stress enough how important it is to be able to hear all the nuances of a mix. Computer speakers are often hyped in the upper and lower frequencies in the familiar smiley EQ curve. This may force you to over compensate in the mid-frequencies making your final mixes honky sounding. Although you can get used to the sound of such speaker, I find that monitors with unhyped response curves often allow you to make better mixing decisions.

The workshop details is in the Audio Engineering workshop thread put up by edgeofillsion_jepoy. It will be held at BAMF's BAMFx/P.I.M.P. studios located at Sto. Domingo St. cor. Calamba on June 9.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jose roberto on June 04, 2007, 07:44:59 AM
Thanks for the inputs!  :-)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: xjepoyx on June 05, 2007, 03:53:29 AM
@jose roberto

heres the link of the said thread re: workshop.

http://talk.philmusic.com/board/index.php/topic,48389.0.html
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: melvslowhand on June 09, 2007, 05:39:12 AM
 hello everyone, question lang po. why can't i do internal recordings with my audiophile 192? meron na po ba nakagamit sa inyo nito, or 2496 siguro for that matter. the problem is i use gigastudio 2.54 and i don't know any other option of bouncing except to record it in real time. i only have 1 pc so i have to do it within the same pc. i remember using blaster audigy and it had a feature of recording "what you hear". help po from anyone, tahnks po.

melvin
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on June 09, 2007, 08:16:36 PM
With 'what-you-hear', you will still have to record in real time. Doesn't the M-Audio come with GSIF drivers?

Unfortunately, until Gigastudio acts like a vst (which I think is the case with Gigastudio 3), you will have to render in realtime.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: bindoy on June 10, 2007, 09:06:55 PM
OT astig set up nung sabado...dalawang PC>...


ang lupet ng gamit...pwede sample dito sa sticky thread na to..
Mohawk! nakuhanan mo ba ung set up nung sabado?post mo naman...
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: marcowpg3 on June 11, 2007, 12:36:18 PM
mga sir/ma'am

im planning to set up a home recording studio. ano ang recommended recording materials nyo, yung medyo mura lang? im looking at musicians friend.com and maraming murang equipment dun. so far, im getting mostly M AUDIO equipment,

Monitors: Studio Pro 3 desktop audio monitors,
Soundcard: Audiophile 2496 PCI digital audio card,
Interface: FireWire 410 computer recording interface,
Software: Pro tools 7 or Sonar 6

ok na ba ito for home recording? yung PC will be dedicated to recording lang.
ano ang advice ninyo na ok na equipment? yung pwde maidagdag or palitan dito sa mga pinost ko...  TNX!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on June 11, 2007, 12:58:13 PM
@marcowpg3 - lose the 2496 since you already have the Firewire 410. You might want to consider the 1814 if you want more simultaneous inputs since the 410 has a disappointing number of analog inputs. The Delta 44, 66 and 1010 offer a lot more simultaneous analog inputs if that is your preference. You might consider adding a mixer if you choose to get a 4 or 6 input interface since routing now becomes a necessity.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: marcowpg3 on June 11, 2007, 01:19:46 PM
ah so kahit walang soundcard, ok na yun because of the interface? sige ill try to get the 1814, medyo mahal kasi dagdag ako ng almost 200$.. on top of that, sesetup ko palang yung PC for recording kasi...pero kung hindi na kailangan soundcard, i might get the 1814!

and for the PC processor, ok na ba ang compatibility ng AMD, or should i go for Intel core duo?

ito bang set up nato, pang demo quality lang ba ito?
psensya na sir beginner lang kasi ako pag dating sa digital recording kaya dami ko tanong hehehe!!
salamat sir Kit!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on June 11, 2007, 01:32:17 PM
To clarify lang, a soundcard IS an audio interface. In essence, the 410 will become the soundcard, even if it is external. The beauty of external interfaces is their portability, meaning you can move them from one computer to another without having to open up the pc and installing a card and worrying about IRQs.

Firewire and USB2 are the emerging standards while only a pcie soundcards are coming out. Personally I prefer firewire because of the lower cpu loading. The 1814 is nice , you might want to consider Presonus' Firebox, which goes for the same price as the 410 and has more I/O; the Firepod will give you 8 analog inputs for $399. Unfortunately, the Presonus offerings are not compatible with Pro Tools, you might have to stick with M-audio products if that is a requirement.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: marcowpg3 on June 11, 2007, 01:50:53 PM
ah ok, tnx!! yun nga eh, medyo comfortable ako sa pro tools, kaya i might stick with M Audio muna sa ngayon..

thank u very much for the info!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on June 11, 2007, 02:03:35 PM
and for the PC processor, ok na ba ang compatibility ng AMD, or should i go for Intel core duo?

As much as I like AMD, things are not going so well for them in light of Barcelona and Phenom. The undoubted kings of performance right now are Intel C2D's and quads. The problem with M-audio, however, are Vista drivers so consider that before making your mobo choice. If you want a no nonsense firewire on your mobo, consider Gigabyte which has TI firewire chipsets on their higher end mobos.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: marcowpg3 on June 12, 2007, 08:08:17 AM
sir Kit, isa pang question hehehe...
About audio PC's that are dedicated solely for recording, anong maadvice nyo na specs? yung motherboard, vid card, soundcard, memory, power supply wattage etc... pero keep in mind na medyo limited budget lang ako hehehehe! and im sticking with XP sa ngayon..tnx ulit!

and ano mas preferred nyo, Sonar or Pro Tools? Im thinking of getting Pro tools 7.3, kasi yun ang madalas namin ginagamit sa studio. pero ngayon kasi im using Sonar 6 Producer Ed sa home PC ko...
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: marcowpg3 on June 12, 2007, 05:48:27 PM
sir kit eto yung mga specs na tinitignan ko, ok ba ito?
-Win XP
-Intel 3.0 Ghz Dual Core
- Intel D965 GCCLR motherboard (with firewire)
-1 gig memory
  tapos may on board video and audio yung motherboard (ok na ba yung audio nitong mobo?)
(compatible naman ito with Pro Tools or Sonar diba?)
Tnx!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jun_gats on June 15, 2007, 11:46:53 AM
sir Kitc,

what can you say about the sb x-fi elite pro or an m-audio sound card? btw whats a good mic to record from a gutiar amp. I just want to create a decent demo. What do you suggest? Thanks
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: Phil on June 16, 2007, 03:02:36 AM
sir Kitc,

what can you say about the sb x-fi elite pro or an m-audio sound card? btw whats a good mic to record from a gutiar amp. I just want to create a decent demo. What do you suggest? Thanks
e609s
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: Phil on June 16, 2007, 03:04:02 AM
sir kit eto yung mga specs na tinitignan ko, ok ba ito?
-Win XP
-Intel 3.0 Ghz Dual Core
- Intel D965 GCCLR motherboard (with firewire)
-1 gig memory
  tapos may on board video and audio yung motherboard (ok na ba yung audio nitong mobo?)
(compatible naman ito with Pro Tools or Sonar diba?)
Tnx!
I would go for at least 2 Gb of memory.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: marcowpg3 on June 16, 2007, 03:57:25 PM
ok salamat sir phil!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: hugaspaso78 on June 17, 2007, 12:26:39 AM
Hello po Sirs,

Your impression po for the Zoom G2.1u guitar effects with USB interface as recording gear. Sa tingin nyo its decent enough for those with tight budget? I used un Cubase for recording, me latency po sya pero kung bypassed naman e pede mo marinig sya real time. Pede rin sya sa vocals using a decent mic lang.
Meron po ba kayong better setup for budget as tight as un mgagastos mo for this setup?

Thanks  :-)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on June 17, 2007, 01:54:15 PM
sir kit eto yung mga specs na tinitignan ko, ok ba ito?
-Win XP
-Intel 3.0 Ghz Dual Core
- Intel D965 GCCLR motherboard (with firewire)
-1 gig memory
  tapos may on board video and audio yung motherboard (ok na ba yung audio nitong mobo?)
(compatible naman ito with Pro Tools or Sonar diba?)
Tnx!

Yes. This will work.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on June 17, 2007, 01:55:39 PM
sir Kitc,

what can you say about the sb x-fi elite pro or an m-audio sound card? btw whats a good mic to record from a gutiar amp. I just want to create a decent demo. What do you suggest? Thanks

I'd choose the M-Audio. Phil's reco on the e609 is recommended as well.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on June 17, 2007, 01:58:28 PM
Hello po Sirs,

Your impression po for the Zoom G2.1u guitar effects with USB interface as recording gear. Sa tingin nyo its decent enough for those with tight budget? I used un Cubase for recording, me latency po sya pero kung bypassed naman e pede mo marinig sya real time. Pede rin sya sa vocals using a decent mic lang.
Meron po ba kayong better setup for budget as tight as un mgagastos mo for this setup?

Thanks  :-)

If you have a small mixer, try routing the analog output of the Zoom and Cubase into the mixer so that you have zero latency hardware monitoring. Turn off input monitoring in the guitar track to prevent phasing while recording.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jun_gats on June 19, 2007, 10:38:23 AM
sir Kitc,

what can you say about the sb x-fi elite pro or an m-audio sound card? btw whats a good mic to record from a gutiar amp. I just want to create a decent demo. What do you suggest? Thanks
e609s

thanks sir Phil
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jun_gats on June 19, 2007, 10:47:17 AM
sir Kitc,

what can you say about the sb x-fi elite pro or an m-audio sound card? btw whats a good mic to record from a gutiar amp. I just want to create a decent demo. What do you suggest? Thanks

I'd choose the M-Audio. Phil's reco on the e609 is recommended as well.

Thanks sir Kitc
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: marcowpg3 on June 25, 2007, 11:28:50 AM
sir kit eto yung mga specs na tinitignan ko, ok ba ito?
-Win XP
-Intel 3.0 Ghz Dual Core
- Intel D965 GCCLR motherboard (with firewire)
-1 gig memory
  tapos may on board video and audio yung motherboard (ok na ba yung audio nitong mobo?)
(compatible naman ito with Pro Tools or Sonar diba?)
Tnx!

Yes. This will work.

tnx sir kit!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on June 25, 2007, 11:40:46 AM
sir kit eto yung mga specs na tinitignan ko, ok ba ito?
-Win XP
-Intel 3.0 Ghz Dual Core
- Intel D965 GCCLR motherboard (with firewire)
-1 gig memory
  tapos may on board video and audio yung motherboard (ok na ba yung audio nitong mobo?)
(compatible naman ito with Pro Tools or Sonar diba?)
Tnx!

Yes. This will work.

tnx sir kit!

I forgot to add. Protools needs specific hardware in order to run. You cannot use onboard audio for PT, only Sonar. From what I read, M-Audio's Jamlab interface is the cheapest way to get into PT, or you can use Digidesign's Mbox interface for PT LE. For the hardcore PT HD systems, I suggest checking for compatibility on the Digi site.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: axebass26 on July 16, 2007, 08:31:17 PM
sirs... the software i'm currently using is sony vegas 7.0... is this an okay software or should i use other software?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on July 16, 2007, 10:10:28 PM
Vegas is primarily an audio post production tool for video. While it can be used for recording, it might not have the necessary tools for other aspects of audio production such as midi. Browse the sticky on free plugins and software, there are links there to several free audio recording software. There are also time limited demos of Sonar and other software that you can download. Pay special attention to Reaper which is unexpiring shareware.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jun_gats on July 25, 2007, 06:55:28 AM
Sir, If I have a shure sm57 and an Maudio 2496 how do I connect it? is it just straight cable or do I need any additional hardware? tnx
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on July 25, 2007, 11:44:07 AM
Sir, If I have a shure sm57 and an Maudio 2496 how do I connect it? is it just straight cable or do I need any additional hardware? tnx

Get a mic preamp or a small mixer. Use the mixer to interface between the mic and your 2496.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jun_gats on July 26, 2007, 01:26:51 PM
thank you verymuch sir.  :-D
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jun_gats on August 12, 2007, 01:59:55 AM
Sir, If I have a shure sm57 and an Maudio 2496 how do I connect it? is it just straight cable or do I need any additional hardware? tnx

Get a mic preamp or a small mixer. Use the mixer to interface between the mic and your 2496.

sir from (mic)sm57 - (mixer) samson MDR6 6-Channel - (sound card) m-audio 2496 from (mixer) where do I connect the output since the soundcard needs an rca input? the only output on the mixer for rca is the cd output... do I need a special cable or converter? thanks
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on August 12, 2007, 10:54:44 AM
You can use the cd output but you lose master level control flexibility. Better to use the main outs or control room outs. You can use any rca-to-rca cable, just add those rca-to-PL (1/4" TS) adapters so you can connect those to the main/control room outs.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jun_gats on August 12, 2007, 09:01:45 PM
thanks sir kitc, pacenya na i'm a nube for setting things like this.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: carl20 on August 17, 2007, 05:01:52 PM
mga sir napadaan lng kasali po sa thread na to ung sa soundproofing? thanks po  :-D
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on August 19, 2007, 11:33:08 AM
mga sir napadaan lng kasali po sa thread na to ung sa soundproofing? thanks po  :-D

The thread title is specific, "Setting up your PC for Recording". There is already a thread re: soundproofing.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: stanley on August 31, 2007, 11:34:22 PM
sir, do i need a mic preamp if i already have a mixer ( behringer 1202) with built in mic preamp. thanks
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 01, 2007, 01:06:42 AM
sir, do i need a mic preamp if i already have a mixer ( behringer 1202) with built in mic preamp. thanks

Depends. If you're not happy with the sound of the 1202, you can get an external preamp that gives you the clarity and/or coloration that you want. Btw, I was reading a very unbiased review of the xenyx preamps and it compared favorably with the mackie XDR preamps.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: x_taxi on September 01, 2007, 01:21:23 AM
sir, do i need a mic preamp if i already have a mixer ( behringer 1202) with built in mic preamp. thanks

even the names rhyme:  xenyx = onyx?

seriously, you'll need to spend a lot more to have a noticeable performance advantage.  personally, i'd use it till it breaks.  then you'd most probably have learned and earned enough to move up to better preamps.

 :-) :-) :-)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 01, 2007, 01:23:51 AM
Oh! Not the Onyx, Vince! It's heads above the Xenyx by a wide margin. The XDR preamps are pre-onyx, usually found in the VLZ series mixers.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: x_taxi on September 01, 2007, 01:26:39 AM
oh those?  hehe.  my bad.

xdr din ba yun nasa mackie spike?

 :-) :-) :-)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 01, 2007, 01:35:18 AM
Yup! the spike does have xdr preamps. To be specific about the xenyx, look for the March 2007 issue of Recording. Even user reviews in some forums confirm this but, in general, they say the xenyx preamps are warmer and bigger, while the VLZ was a bit airier and had a more natural soundstage.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: kremetory on September 02, 2007, 09:38:15 PM
Ok.... rather than set up a tutorial thread, let's make this into a Q & A sort of thread and the emphasis will be on setting up your PC regardless of the specs. Remember, however, that some pc configurations are not compatible with audio no matter what you do. Also remember that most pc's coming out today have a decided slant towards powerful video capabilities, something which often conflicts with glitch-free audio performance. If you are decided about great audio performance, you will have to give up great video performance (which means you will have to give up that 8800GTXProMillenium+1 and go for a considerably less powerful vidcard).

Q1: yah i've read this part and i was wondering if how does a high end video card would affect the audiocard of the pc??????
Q2: do you sell gears for recording like mixers and other pre-amps and amps that is not that expensive coz' im just new in this kind of business....hope you could help me out thanks.
Q3: what is SPDIF what is it for???
 
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: stanley on September 02, 2007, 11:47:21 PM
Yup! the spike does have xdr preamps. To be specific about the xenyx, look for the March 2007 issue of Recording. Even user reviews in some forums confirm this but, in general, they say the xenyx preamps are warmer and bigger, while the VLZ was a bit airier and had a more natural soundstage.

thanks sir kitC.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 03, 2007, 12:11:10 AM
Q1: yah i've read this part and i was wondering if how does a high end video card would affect the audiocard of the pc??????

While you can use a relatively powerful video card, bear in mind that audio also has stringent needs with regards to processing, that's why it's often recommended to use a less powerful vidcard. Video card manufacturers are sneaky... they know how to wring every last ounce of processing power from the cpu; everything from hogging the pci bus to throttling down other peripherals. That's why SLI and Crossfire capable motherboards are often not recommended for audio, and why I strongly advocate DAWs dedicated to audio processing.

Q2: do you sell gears for recording like mixers and other pre-amps and amps that is not that expensive coz' im just new in this kind of business....hope you could help me out thanks.

No, I don't sell gear... but I could recommend you to the 'good guys'.

Q3: what is SPDIF what is it for???
 
S/PDIF stands for Sony/Philips Digital InterFace. It is a digital audio protocol jointly developed by Sony and Philips for the transfer of audio signals digitally. It was originally a consumer format but has gained widespread acceptance in audio circles. It was originally an electrical format using unbalanced coax cables, but has since been adapted to optical transmission as well. Most semi-pro and pro soundcards (as well as some consumer gear) have s/pdif in one form or another.

hth,
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jv21 on September 03, 2007, 11:18:44 AM
sir Kit, i usually experience DROPOUTs whenevr i record. what usually triggers this? i only have 512mb of Ram. my kinalaman po ba to?  (im using SONAr 6.) tnx. : )
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 03, 2007, 11:48:09 AM
sir Kit, i usually experience DROPOUTs whenevr i record. what usually triggers this? i only have 512mb of Ram. my kinalaman po ba to?  (im using SONAr 6.) tnx. : )

Lot's of things can contribute to this but the first thing you should look at is if the soundcard is sharing an IRQ with something else. Open Device Manager then View > Resources by Type and expand the IRQ tree. You will see a list of IRQs and the soundcard SHOULD have it's own IRQ. If you are using onboard sound, sorry, there's only so much you can do with it, if you are using a soundblaster, it might be able to work with another device but at the expense of sound quality.

If your soundcard DOES share with another device, you will have to move it to another pci slot. Sorry, there's no other way about this since the ACPI protocol automates IRQ assignment and does not allow user assignment of IRQs. You will have to uninstall the soundcard in device manager, shutdown, then move it to another slot and re-install the card. Do this until you can dedicate an IRQ to the card. In some cases, if the card is sharing with usb, firewire, or the onboard NIC, you can disable those devices in bios if you don't use those features.

There are other causes for dropouts to such as hard disks in PIO mode, slow HD speeds or bottlenecks. Exceeding the capacity of the cpu can cause dropouts as well as buffer settings in the software. My advice, however is to make sure that all hardware is working properly at first, and only then should you consider making software adjustments.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jv21 on September 03, 2007, 12:08:11 PM
very well said sir.. thanks!  :-D anyway, im planning to purchase an M-audio Delta 1010 pci digital audio computer interface and a USB mixer. can i install the M-audio soundcard without un-installing the on board sound card? sorry 4 the stupid question. hehe  :-D
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: kremetory on September 03, 2007, 09:22:22 PM
Lot's of things can contribute to this but the first thing you should look at is if the soundcard is sharing an IRQ with something else. Open Device Manager then View > Resources by Type and expand the IRQ tree. You will see a list of IRQs and the soundcard SHOULD have it's own IRQ. If you are using onboard sound, sorry, there's only so much you can do with it, if you are using a soundblaster, it might be able to work with another device but at the expense of sound quality.

If your soundcard DOES share with another device, you will have to move it to another pci slot. Sorry, there's no other way about this since the ACPI protocol automates IRQ assignment and does not allow user assignment of IRQs. You will have to uninstall the soundcard in device manager, shutdown, then move it to another slot and re-install the card. Do this until you can dedicate an IRQ to the card. In some cases, if the card is sharing with usb, firewire, or the onboard NIC, you can disable those devices in bios if you don't use those features.

There are other causes for dropouts to such as hard disks in PIO mode, slow HD speeds or bottlenecks. Exceeding the capacity of the cpu can cause dropouts as well as buffer settings in the software. My advice, however is to make sure that all hardware is working properly at first, and only then should you consider making software adjustments.

hey sir thanks a lot for helpin' me out
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 03, 2007, 10:02:55 PM
very well said sir.. thanks!  :-D anyway, im planning to purchase an M-audio Delta 1010 pci digital audio computer interface and a USB mixer. can i install the M-audio soundcard without un-installing the on board sound card? sorry 4 the stupid question. hehe  :-D

You can run a pci soundcard simultaneously with onboard sound. I just wonder why you would need a usb mixer.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jv21 on September 04, 2007, 09:27:30 AM
You can run a pci soundcard simultaneously with onboard sound. I just wonder why you would need a usb mixer.

im planing to put up a home recording studio sir. anyway, regarding setting up the pc for recording purposes, ok na po ba to:? (or if hnde, ano po mga kailangan upgrade aside from its RAM na 512MB lang..)

peNTIUM 4, 3.00  gHZ
RAM 512MB
HD: 80 gig partioned at 40, 30 and 10.

Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 04, 2007, 09:57:52 AM
Just one HD? Get another HD for your audio data. Audio typically uses a lot of HD space, and your DAW apps will take up a lot of your remaining space on your 80 gig drive. Why 3 partitions? I personally have an 80 gig system drive (partitioned into two 40 gig logical drives), I've used up the 40 gig system in no time! If I were to redo my system drive, I would partition 5 - 10 gigs specifically for the swap file, and this partition would be located at the fastest part of the drive (there are partition and defrag utilities that allow you to do that).

I also have an audio data drive, 160 gigs unpartitioned. It is important to have 2 physical drives in case you experience drive failure. I've even made the other drive bootable just in case of boot failure on my main system drive - remember, if the MBR fails on your main system drive, you won't be able to access data on any of the partitions in that drive.

Lastly, I can't stress the importance of data backup. If I have my project files on my system drive, I have a duplicate on my data drive too, as well as a dvd copy... just in case.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jv21 on September 04, 2007, 11:20:39 AM
tnx sir.  :-D
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: legato on September 05, 2007, 02:11:10 PM
I have an el cheapo DAW in the making (old P4 2.4Ghz, 1G RAM, 80+160 HDD), a Xenix 802 Mixer, a boombox monitor and an M-Audio 2496 (on order). The plan is to use it to record backing and guitar tracks to learn a thing or two about recording.

I also have an old Boss DR660 drum machine that is stored somewhere gathering dust. Should I connect this too? And how do I apply and use it? Is it necessary or is software enough?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jv21 on September 05, 2007, 03:15:38 PM
hi. what's the difference between a 32 bit and 64  bit computer system in recording?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 05, 2007, 08:43:04 PM
I also have an old Boss DR660 drum machine that is stored somewhere gathering dust. Should I connect this too? And how do I apply and use it? Is it necessary or is software enough?

Software can be enough although, sometmes, hardware can be more immediate than turning on a pc and waiting for it to boot. For example, it would probably take minutes for you to program the DR660 with a nice loop, immediately after turning it on. A pc can take a few minutes just to boot into the OS then you have to launch your DAW software. You can have the best of both worlds by midi'ing up your BR to your pc. It will take some doing but we can guide you through the process - why not make a new thread for that when you get to that situation?

hi. what's the difference between a 32 bit and 64  bit computer system in recording?

A lot in terms of addressable ram, sometimes file sizes and operating systems. Normally, though, the emphasis is on addressable ram which is important to some who like to use LOTS of it, notably those with samplers that load gigabyte size sample libraries. XP will only address 2 gigs of ram, 3 gigs if you engage the /3GB switch; 64 bit OS allow you to address up to 128 gigabytes of RAM. If you don't do a lot of sampling, having that much ram won't benefit you much, but you sure can run at least a hundred instances of MS Excel each with several large spreadsheets.

The problem with 64-bit systems are the lack of drivers for audio devices. Some soundcard manufacturers have developed Vista drivers, but none have developed any WaveRT drivers and only a few have 64-bit drivers. Then, there are those who are saying that latency is worse in Vista. I'm waiting for Vista SP1 to come out before I will even try it out, even then, I don't fancy spending P25k for an OS. Rest assured I'll be posting updates on Vista when it is confirmed that we will be benefitting from that new OS, which some say is turning out to be the new Windows ME.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jv21 on September 06, 2007, 10:17:50 AM
wow.. thanks ulit sir..  :-D anyway, im just wondering, ano gmet ng D.I? ano difference nya pag d gumamit ng D.I?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: legato on September 06, 2007, 10:35:36 AM
Thanks kit! Will do, got too excited there.  :-D
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: gobernor on September 15, 2007, 02:49:03 PM
sir kit,

im new to this field and would like to get more information and this thread's a good read for starters. i am planning to use my pc as a daw, is it possible with my current spec?

amd sempron am2 2ghz
msi k9ngm-v (nvidia-based mobo) - Chipset NVIDIA® MCP61
512mb shared with video(On-Board VGA nVidia GeForce 6100)
80gb/160gb sata drives
xp pro sp2

i am not sure if my specs will be able to do recording so can you suggest additional hw required for me to add on a budget? exclude the ram since im getting 2gb soon. im currently reading materials for vegas 6 and audition 2. any info will be appreciated.

thanks!
:-D
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 15, 2007, 06:20:21 PM
gobernor,

Start with a good soundcard. I suggest getting an M-Audio 2496 if all you need is stereo I/O. Next, get a good pair of monitors if you will be mixing. You can start with a stereo component kung walang budget, but always compare your mixes with playback different systems. In the end, good monitors should be part of your listening chain.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: gobernor on September 19, 2007, 03:52:57 PM
thanks for the reply sir kit!

sulitin ko na, other than a good sound card, anything else you can recommend for a startup DAW? based on the specs i had, im not sure kung kakayin nya maging DAW...

my requirements for this project will be for creating demos(na quality cyempre) and overall music production kung kakayanin.

thanks again sir kit!

 :-D
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 19, 2007, 04:10:30 PM
I'm going to go out on a limb here pero you can create good demos with a soundblaster, PROVIDING you have a good sounding room to begin with, good instruments and other outboard gear like mics and preamps. This assumes you will be recording a band and you will treat your pc as a 2-track recorder. Let me assure you that it can be done. This is even truer if all you will be doing are midi demos since the blasters are very capable in that department.

BUT... let me balance this by saying that a soundblaster will only get you so far with audio, especially if you want to track each instrument individually and with regards to sound quality since the blaster was intended mostly for sound playback, not recording - Creative cut a few corners in the A/D department. Tip: Someone is selling his Delta 1010LT (which is an 8 analog input card) in the classifieds. You will need to pair this with a good mixer with at least 6 mic preamps (the 1010LT has 2 XLR inputs) and at least 6 direct outs, so be advised.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: gobernor on September 19, 2007, 04:49:44 PM
thanks sa tip sir kit!

as much as possible live tracks sana so soundblasters are out of the equation. m audio nako. mapapalaban pala talaga ako sa gastusan dito sir kit.

thanks po sa prompt reply!

will be looking forward for more helpful tips here!

more power sir kit!

***baka may marerecommend po kayong good deal for recording demos
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 19, 2007, 05:06:31 PM
Tip of the iceberg pa lang yan. Next will come the quest for better mics, better preamps, better gear, better software... haaayyyy.... welcome to G.A.S.

***baka may marerecommend po kayong good deal for recording demos

I'm not sure what you mean by this. If you mean bands who want to record demos, I give you 2 words: package deal.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: replica on September 21, 2007, 08:55:14 AM
pa post naman mo ng connection ng Mixer to PC  :-D
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 21, 2007, 11:42:12 AM
pa post naman mo ng connection ng Mixer to PC  :-D

How to Hook Up a Mixer (http://www.tweakheadz.com/how_to_hookup_a_mixer.htm).
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: kamots on September 21, 2007, 01:33:45 PM
Warning: N0ob question follows!!!

When recording a guitar, what are the the differences/pros/cons of using a USB interface (say MI Audio Jamlab) vs. a good soundcard (and a DI box?)? Or does the  apples and oranges thing apply here?

TIA
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: replica on September 21, 2007, 01:42:30 PM
How to Hook Up a Mixer (http://www.tweakheadz.com/how_to_hookup_a_mixer.htm).

thanks for the link
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: marcowpg3 on September 26, 2007, 01:50:35 PM
sir Kit, question lang, i just bought an M Audio 1814 firewire interface with Pro tools software, and i intend to use it sa PC muna kasi wala naman ako pang buget sa mac. i think ive asked u this before e, pero tatanong ko na din uli hehehe. what's the most compatible motherboard for this kind of setup? kasi i intend to get Intel dual core na processor...hindi ko lang alam kung magiging compatible to any kind of motherboard yung interface na 1814, kinakabahan lang ako baka masayang pag mali yung nakuha kong motherboard. thank u so much!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 26, 2007, 02:13:22 PM
You do not need a mac to run PT with your 1814. For one thing, the PT that comes with any M-audio product is merely the the M-powered version, a relatively stripped down PT that has no access to TDM hardware and plugs. Secondly, PT has been proven to work on both OSX and XP so there is no difference in functionality. Third, PT on OSX and XP WILL CRASH if you let it. Just because it's a Mac doesn't mean it's more stable, the only upside is that a Mac works out of the box although you still have to tweak it just a little to squeeze the most performance out of it. Bang-for-the-buck goes to properly configured pc systems as long as you have the right combination of parts and OS configuration. One thing you should do with PT: don't use Vista!

As for recommended pc's, go to the Digidesign site for recommended systems. Off the hat, though, I could say that most present day computers will run the 1814 fine although only the high end mobos have TI-equipped firewire chipsets, Asus and Gigabyte in particular. Another thing to check is that PT M-powered doesn't seem to like multi-core processing, so that will be a MAJOR consideration. Digi is comnig out with Vista tweaks, though, so expect to spend for the upgrade.  :evil:
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: bassman88 on September 26, 2007, 02:22:08 PM
You do not need a mac to run PT with your 1814. For one thing, the PT that comes with any M-audio product is merely the the M-powered version, a relatively stripped down PT that has no access to TDM hardware and plugs. Secondly, PT has been proven to work on both OSX and XP so there is no difference in functionality. Third, PT on OSX and XP WILL CRASH if you let it. Just because it's a Mac doesn't mean it's more stable, the only upside is that a Mac works out of the box although you still have to tweak it just a little to squeeze the most performance out of it. Bang-for-the-buck goes to properly configured pc systems as long as you have the right combination of parts and OS configuration. One thing you should do with PT: don't use Vista!

As for recommended pc's, go to the Digidesign site for recommended systems. Off the hat, though, I could say that most present day computers will run the 1814 fine although only the high end mobos have TI-equipped firewire chipsets, Asus and Gigabyte in particular. Another thing to check is that PT M-powered doesn't seem to like multi-core processing, so that will be a MAJOR consideration. Digi is comnig out with Vista tweaks, though, so expect to spend for the upgrade.  :evil:

TI-equipped firewire chipsets? What are these? Kasi i just bought a firewire PCI card e. Ok lang ba to? will it affect record quality? Btw, magkano bili mo sa 1814?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 26, 2007, 02:38:34 PM
TI-equipped firewire chipsets? What are these? Kasi i just bought a firewire PCI card e. Ok lang ba to? will it affect record quality? Btw, magkano bili mo sa 1814?

Among the TI-equipped firewire chipset motherboards are: Asus P5WDH (i975), Asus P5B Deluxe (i965), Gigabyte GA-965 DQ6, Gigabyte GA-P35 DQ6... practically most of the high end mobos from these 2 manufacturers. I'm not 100% sure but I think Abit has something similar (Abit IP35 Pro).

A firewire pci card will not affect audio quality since what is passing through the card is already data. What it important is that chipset of the card (again, should be TI). There have been reports of other chipsets that work but YMMV.

marcowpg has the 1814... I use an Emu 1820m.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: marcowpg3 on September 26, 2007, 04:22:23 PM
thanks very much sir kit!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: bassman88 on September 26, 2007, 04:24:52 PM
marco, where and how much did you buy ur 1814? Im thinking of buying kasi
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: marcowpg3 on September 26, 2007, 04:29:04 PM
Another thing to check is that PT M-powered doesn't seem to like multi-core processing, so that will be a MAJOR consideration.

so you mean i dont need the dual core, that a pentium 4 processor will suffice? or is it much better to get a dual core processor for future reference/use? thanks! sorry kulit hehehe...
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: marcowpg3 on September 26, 2007, 04:36:52 PM
marco, where and how much did you buy ur 1814? Im thinking of buying kasi

nagpabili ako sa US, theres a very good package sa musiciansfriend.com or sa music123.com, all in all $799 dollars yung package. it includes the M-audio 1814 interface, Protools M powered 7.3, AKG condenser mic, Senheiser headphones, cables and a mic stand. Actually hindi pa dumadating pero excited na ako haha! I tried to canvass the stuff here, individually aabot ng roughly P70K, wala pa yung computer, so ang laki ng ititipid mo kung sa US mo makukuha.

anyway, heres the link: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/MAudio-Pro-Tools-1814-Package?sku=709207
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: marcowpg3 on September 26, 2007, 04:42:07 PM
meron din dito ng 1814 sa JB music, and somewhere at makati cinema square beside brochiere computers. it costs around P40K, and the protools software i think nasa P18K
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 26, 2007, 04:46:49 PM
so you mean i dont need the dual core, that a pentium 4 processor will suffice? or is it much better to get a dual core processor for future reference/use? thanks! sorry kulit hehehe...

Look at it this way. The technology changes every 18 months or sometimes even lesser. You can get a dual core but make sure your mobo can accept quad and higher number cores in order to futureproof it. The limitation of the software is only temporary and it will always be addressed by updates/upgrades. That's why I prefer software that isn't tied to hardware the way PT is. On the other side, the PT MP system is compatible with HD and LE systems hence opens the door to porting your tracks and mixes to higher level PT suites.

Btw, forget about the old P4 systems and go C2D. The advantages are there like lower power usage and high utilization. You might have to configure PT to use a single core in the outset, but I'm sure Digidesign will address that issue, if they haven't already (which is weird since I'm sure PT can work with dual-cpu configurations, it's with multicore that they seem to hit a snag).
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: arzoeffect on September 26, 2007, 08:11:54 PM
mga sirs how bout for laptops? pwede po bng direct ang mixer sa line-in ng laptop?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 26, 2007, 08:28:42 PM
mga sirs how bout for laptops? pwede po bng direct ang mixer sa line-in ng laptop?

Technically yes, pero you are limited to stereo input. The better solution would be to get a usb2 or firewire interface if the laptop has those ports. Another would be to use a firewire mixer. The problem with laptop onboard audio is the quality of the converters, aside from the 1/8" stereo jacks which are fragile.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: arzoeffect on September 26, 2007, 08:34:53 PM
hmm...i see...yep mine has firewire & usb2.0 ports...any suggestion with such kind of mixers? yung budget friendly po sana...hehehe! thanks!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 26, 2007, 08:53:11 PM
Try the alesis firewire mixers. We've had good experience with those.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: arzoeffect on September 26, 2007, 08:58:39 PM
ok i'll look for it...big thanks!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: bassman88 on September 28, 2007, 09:35:42 AM
nagpabili ako sa US, theres a very good package sa musiciansfriend.com or sa music123.com, all in all $799 dollars yung package. it includes the M-audio 1814 interface, Protools M powered 7.3, AKG condenser mic, Senheiser headphones, cables and a mic stand. Actually hindi pa dumadating pero excited na ako haha! I tried to canvass the stuff here, individually aabot ng roughly P70K, wala pa yung computer, so ang laki ng ititipid mo kung sa US mo makukuha.

anyway, heres the link: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/MAudio-Pro-Tools-1814-Package?sku=709207

Actually sa musiciansfriend rin ako bibili kaso ung unit lang, problema lang ung shipping. Meron kasing scratch and dent sale, nasa $359 nalang ung 1814 firewire unit. Paano ang setup mo dito? kulang ka pa ng preamps ah. haha! Im gonna use it to record drums kasi. Hassel... Anyway, nagshship ba ang musiciansfriend dito sa pinas? magkano shipping?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: bassman88 on September 28, 2007, 09:39:01 AM
@KitC: Sir kit, mahirap ba ang configuration ng Alesis firewire mixers sa Cubase? Multi track ba ang pasok nito sa computer? Kasi priority ko is maedit ko per channel, like sa drums, kunyari, ung isang tom lang sa isang channel para matweak  ko without affecting the other toms. thanks!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 28, 2007, 12:13:42 PM
@KitC: Sir kit, mahirap ba ang configuration ng Alesis firewire mixers sa Cubase? Multi track ba ang pasok nito sa computer? Kasi priority ko is maedit ko per channel, like sa drums, kunyari, ung isang tom lang sa isang channel para matweak  ko without affecting the other toms. thanks!

When we used Jepoy's Multimix 8FW in Purple Haze, we were able to record all 8 channels individually; firewire is more than capable of handling that many tracks. The only caveat is that asio always treats audio streams as stereo pairs so that you will have to setup your VST Inputs to separate each asio L/R pair as a mono input (ex., left channel=input 1, right channel=input 2 and so on...).

Btw, musiciansfriend does not ship overseas. Hint: Use Johnny Air cargo...
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: kamots on September 28, 2007, 01:53:36 PM
Warning: N0ob question follows!!!

When recording a guitar, what are the the differences/pros/cons of using a USB interface (say MI Audio Jamlab) vs. a good soundcard (and a DI box?)? Or does the  apples and oranges thing apply here?

TIA

No takers?  :-D
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 28, 2007, 02:10:57 PM
No takers?  :-D

Sorry about that. I was waiting for the guitar-oriented recordists to post but I'll bite.

It does matter whether you're using an inexpensive interface vs. a more expensive one, specifically with the converters. Ideally, you want an interface that can give you as much fidelity and the least coloration when you record. You also want a converter that can record to at least 96 khz and 24-bits; the bitrate is especially important if you want to have extra processing headroom. I personally record to 24 bits because the processing on the tails and fades is a lot smoother compared to 16-bit. The Jamlab only records up to 48 khz - not a deal breaker, but it is limited to a single guitar input so is not capable of accommodating other sources like keyboards and microphones - strictly a guitar recording interface.

The data protocol can be important; USB 2.0 is preferable to USB 1.1 interfaces because of the greater data bandwidth. Firewire is a very good alternative to USB 2 because firewire has lower cpu overhead. In terms of data transfer rates, pci soundcards provides the fastest to date. All that is moot, however, if the interface's drivers are bad, i.e., cannot provide a low enough latency for you to overdub or to record comfortably while playing back other tracks. Another thing to look out for is how monitoring is implemented. Some interfaces will not monitor through hardware while software monitoring usually introduces latency - something to watch out for.

EDIT: typo
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: marcowpg3 on September 28, 2007, 05:29:17 PM
Actually sa musiciansfriend rin ako bibili kaso ung unit lang, problema lang ung shipping. Meron kasing scratch and dent sale, nasa $359 nalang ung 1814 firewire unit. Paano ang setup mo dito? kulang ka pa ng preamps ah. haha! Im gonna use it to record drums kasi. Hassel... Anyway, nagshship ba ang musiciansfriend dito sa pinas? magkano shipping?

sa shipping, kasi may friend ako na uuwi dito so he's gonna bring it back with him. pero pwede ka din magpadala from the states ng balikbayan box, i think it costs around $75. about the preamps, yun nga wala pa ako nun.

SIR KITC, question; can the interface be used as a preamp? or do you have to get a preamp separately for this kind of home studio to work? sorry for the newbie questions kasi im really just starting out and baka kulang yung gamit ko and i might be missing some essential stuff para sa simpleng home studio. although meron din naman akong multi effects processors for guitars and sansamp direct box for bass. pwde bang rekta sa interface yung mga instruments and mics? or mas ok kung papadaanin sa preamp?

ganito kasi yung set up ko when my stuff gets here:
COMPUTER -> INTERFACE -> DIRECT BOX/PROCESSORS -> INSTRUMENTS/MICS

is this gonna work? or did i just spend for nothing? HELP!! :? :-o :?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: kamots on September 28, 2007, 06:15:41 PM
Sorry about that.......

No apology necessary. I'm gonna have to re-read that while paying more attention to the words a couple of times before I totally get  :-) it but thanks for the reply
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 28, 2007, 06:21:01 PM
SIR KITC, question; can the interface be used as a preamp?

The 1814 has 8 analog line inputs of which inputs 1 & 2 share a mic preamp along with the unbalanced line inputs 1 & 2 at the back of the unit. In order to use mics with the other 6 inputs, you will need to add 6 mic preamps.

All is not lost since the 1814 also has ADAT I/O. The easy (and relatively cheap way) to add 8 additional mic preamps is to get something like the Behringer ADA8000 and connect it via lightpipe to the ADAT input. This will give you a total of 10 mic preamps plus 6 line inputs available for keyboards/synths and ampsim lineouts.

hth,
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: bassman88 on September 28, 2007, 08:17:16 PM
The 1814 has 8 analog line inputs of which inputs 1 & 2 share a mic preamp along with the unbalanced line inputs 1 & 2 at the back of the unit. In order to use mics with the other 6 inputs, you will need to add 6 mic preamps.

All is not lost since the 1814 also has ADAT I/O. The easy (and relatively cheap way) to add 8 additional mic preamps is to get something like the Behringer ADA8000 and connect it via lightpipe to the ADAT input. This will give you a total of 10 mic preamps plus 6 line inputs available for keyboards/synths and ampsim lineouts.

hth,

Sir Kit, if we do this method, won't it mean entering the computer as a single track lang? Lahat ng nakasaksak sa ADA8000?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 29, 2007, 12:05:14 AM
Sir Kit, if we do this method, won't it mean entering the computer as a single track lang? Lahat ng nakasaksak sa ADA8000?

No. The ADA8000 is an 8-channel mic/line preamp which can give you 8 separate tracks. It is slaved to the 1814 by means of the lightpipe connection; the ADA serves to increase the available analog inputs and outputs to the 1814. If you use the ADA in conjunction with the 1814, you will have a total of 16 analog inputs and outputs.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: stilljey on September 29, 2007, 08:11:07 AM
sir, what is lightpipe or lightpipe connection?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: x_taxi on September 29, 2007, 10:06:53 AM
sir, what is lightpipe or lightpipe connection?

that's what they call the connection to transfer digital audio with the use of fiber optics, hence the name.  since pinoy tayo, we call it by the brand name, yun din yun tinatawag natin na adat.

 :-) :-) :-)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: xjepoyx on September 29, 2007, 11:01:06 AM
ADAT is not a brand po. registered trademark lang ng Alesis with their 8 track digital tape recorder that was released in the early 90's. Pero YES ADAT transfer is called lightpipe :)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: x_taxi on September 29, 2007, 12:22:28 PM
ADAT is not a brand po. registered trademark lang ng Alesis with their 8 track digital tape recorder that was released in the early 90's. Pero YES ADAT transfer is called lightpipe :)

hehe.  alesis digital audio tape?  sorry boss jepoy.  i stand corrected.  thanks for clearin that up.

slightly OT(?):  sadly, i still call my toothpaste colgate...

 :-) :-) :-)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: marcowpg3 on September 29, 2007, 03:41:43 PM
thanks for all the advice and insights!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: xjepoyx on September 29, 2007, 04:11:08 PM
hehehe np xtaxi :)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: stilljey on September 30, 2007, 04:18:12 AM
thanks din mga sir :-)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jun_gats on October 07, 2007, 03:54:22 AM
mga sirs... ok napo ba ito para makapag record ako sa pc?  or kulang papo? di ko kasi alam kung may mga wires pa akong dapat idagdag. salamat po ng madami

http://www.alesis.com/product.php?id=37 (http://www.alesis.com/product.php?id=37)

http://shure.com/ProAudio/Products/WiredMicrophones/us_pro_SM57-LC_content (http://shure.com/ProAudio/Products/WiredMicrophones/us_pro_SM57-LC_content)



Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: bassman88 on October 07, 2007, 09:20:33 AM
Ano balak mo irecord? Kulang yan pag drums. Check mo if may pre-amps kasama ung mixer mo, kung wala kukulangan ng lakas ung SM57 mo. hehe
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: xjepoyx on October 07, 2007, 10:33:19 AM
mga sirs... ok napo ba ito para makapag record ako sa pc?  or kulang papo? di ko kasi alam kung may mga wires pa akong dapat idagdag. salamat po ng madami

http://www.alesis.com/product.php?id=37 (http://www.alesis.com/product.php?id=37)

http://shure.com/ProAudio/Products/WiredMicrophones/us_pro_SM57-LC_content (http://shure.com/ProAudio/Products/WiredMicrophones/us_pro_SM57-LC_content)





if that is your equipments, Mic > USB Mixer > USB Cable to PC

with a few configurations on your DAW App... your ready to go

edit:

your monitoring speakers should be connected on the output of your USB Mixer

Check mo if may pre-amps kasama ung mixer mo,

Alesis Mixers has a good preamps.

kung wala kukulangan ng lakas ung SM57 mo. hehe

SM57 or Mics perse... doesnt have his own "LAKAS". mics always depends on mic mixer, amplifiers or mic preamps
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jun_gats on October 07, 2007, 12:36:15 PM
Ano balak mo irecord? Kulang yan pag drums. Check mo if may pre-amps kasama ung mixer mo, kung wala kukulangan ng lakas ung SM57 mo. hehe

guitar lng sir, may nakalagay sa manual na may phantom mode daw yung mixer, kapag tinurn on daw yun e mgkakaroon ng boost yung 4 inputs na 48v... tama kaya pagkakaintindi ko? di ba masisira yung mic?

http://www.alesis.com/downloads/manuals/Alesis_iMultiMix8USB_Reference_revC.pdf (http://www.alesis.com/downloads/manuals/Alesis_iMultiMix8USB_Reference_revC.pdf)

if that is your equipments, Mic > USB Mixer > USB Cable to PC

with a few configurations on your DAW App... your ready to go

edit:

your monitoring speakers should be connected on the output of your USB Mixer

Alesis Mixers has a good preamps.

SM57 or Mics perse... doesnt have his own "LAKAS". mics always depends on mic mixer, amplifiers or mic preamps

di ko pa sya nabibili sir, this month pa kasi papasabay ko lng sa officemate ko pgpunta nya sa us. good to hear sir kasi wala akong alam sa mixer e, first time ko palang kung sakali.

wala panga akong nakikitang monitor speakers, pwede bang head phone nalang?

may nakalagay na phantom power sabi boost daw ng 48v yung mic para sa mga condenser, atsaka kailangan ko pla ng xlr cable di ba?  
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on October 07, 2007, 05:46:55 PM
guitar lng sir, may nakalagay sa manual na may phantom mode daw yung mixer, kapag tinurn on daw yun e mgkakaroon ng boost yung 4 inputs na 48v... tama kaya pagkakaintindi ko? di ba masisira yung mic?

 :?

Boost? Phantom power is meant for powering condenser mics, which will not work without power unlike dynamic mics such as the SM-57/58.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jun_gats on October 07, 2007, 06:23:51 PM
:?

Boost? Phantom power is meant for powering condenser mics, which will not work without power unlike dynamic mics such as the SM-57/58.

I see, so i don't need the phantom power mode because I'm using a dynamic microphone. Do I need any preamp?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on October 07, 2007, 07:22:26 PM
I see, so i don't need the phantom power mode because I'm using a dynamic microphone. Do I need any preamp?

Usually may preamp na ang mixer. Usually the number of XLR inputs equals the number of available preamps. Make sure that the number of preamps are what you need. Most mixers under 16 channels only have 2 to 6 preamps, which may be insufficient for your needs. If you decide on a 12-channel mixer with only 4 preamps, for ex., you can supplant those with external preamps connected to the line inputs such as the MIC200 or TubeMP.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jun_gats on October 08, 2007, 06:37:29 AM
Usually may preamp na ang mixer. Usually the number of XLR inputs equals the number of available preamps. Make sure that the number of preamps are what you need. Most mixers under 16 channels only have 2 to 6 preamps, which may be insufficient for your needs. If you decide on a 12-channel mixer with only 4 preamps, for ex., you can supplant those with external preamps connected to the line inputs such as the MIC200 or TubeMP.

This is indicated in the manual sir Kitc "4 microphone/line inputs with up to 50dB of preamp gain – gives a boost to microphones and instruments with weak levels." I only need it for guitar recording. If I need more preamps in the future pwede ko bang dagdagan ng preamp kahit 8 input lng? usually gaano kadaming preamp ba yung kailangan? intrumental rock genre yung balak kong irecord.

ito yung inoofer nila

Multimix 8 USB (4 mic/line preamps, 4 stereo inputs)
Multimix 12 USB (4 mic/line preamps, 4 stereo inputs)
Multimix 16 USB (8 mic/line preamps, 4 stereo inputs)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on October 08, 2007, 10:02:57 AM
This is indicated in the manual sir Kitc "4 microphone/line inputs with up to 50dB of preamp gain – gives a boost to microphones and instruments with weak levels."  I only need it for guitar recording.

I think this refers to the trim control. Phantom power only powers the preamps built into condenser mics; dynamics do not have these preamps since their  output is sufficient to drive the preamp inputs. The usage of gain in mics and preamps is different from what you are used to with guitars; there comes a point that too much gain will distort your preamp inputs. Unlike with guitars, you do not like distortion when you are capturing a sound.

If I need more preamps in the future pwede ko bang dagdagan ng preamp kahit 8 input lng? usually gaano kadaming preamp ba yung kailangan? intrumental rock genre yung balak kong irecord.

If it's only guitars, you don't need much unless you are fond of intricate miking setups; I have read of setups that used as much as 4 inputs/ preamps for one guitar! Eight preamps are easy to use up when recording a full band. Try to consider your present and future needs.

It's probably better if you choose the firewire mixers instead of the cheaper usb versions. With FW, you can record each channel separately, unlike the usb version which limits you to stereo channels only.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jun_gats on October 08, 2007, 11:35:24 AM
I think this refers to the trim control. Phantom power only powers the preamps built into condenser mics; dynamics do not have these preamps since their  output is sufficient to drive the preamp inputs. The usage of gain in mics and preamps is different from what you are used to with guitars; there comes a point that too much gain will distort your preamp inputs. Unlike with guitars, you do not like distortion when you are capturing a sound.

If it's only guitars, you don't need much unless you are fond of intricate miking setups; I have read of setups that used as much as 4 inputs/ preamps for one guitar! Eight preamps are easy to use up when recording a full band. Try to consider your present and future needs.

It's probably better if you choose the firewire mixers instead of the cheaper usb versions. With FW, you can record each channel separately, unlike the usb version which limits you to stereo channels only.

Thank sir Kitc for all the info, I think I need to research more and save for additional fund, I thought that this is an easy walk to the park but I was wrong. It's totally a different setup from my guitar rig. :)

I also need to purchase a firewire controller card, I thought usb is better.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: bassman88 on October 08, 2007, 06:33:23 PM
I'm selling my m-audio fast track usb if you want, isang input lang sha, pang guitar sakto pero wala pa shang pre-amp. PM mo ko if you want the details.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jun_gats on October 08, 2007, 06:51:10 PM
I'm selling my m-audio fast track usb if you want, isang input lang sha, pang guitar sakto pero wala pa shang pre-amp. PM mo ko if you want the details.

Thanks sir, pero I prefer mixer and mic. I think I'll just save nalang kasi kulang budget ko medyo malaki pla ang kailangan ko. Prang gusto ko nadin ng monitor  :-D Wow! dumami tuloy ang gas ko.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jun_gats on October 09, 2007, 01:50:51 PM
Sir Kitc, If I just purchase the mixer then not use the usb but connect it to a soundcard is it much better or the firewire is still the way to go?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on October 09, 2007, 02:49:49 PM
Sir Kitc, If I just purchase the mixer then not use the usb but connect it to a soundcard is it much better or the firewire is still the way to go?

In both cases, you will only be capable of recording 2 channels of audio. Firewire is one option, a pci soundcard like the M-Audio Delta 1010LT is another if you need multiple input capability. Personally, though, I find firewire mixers to be a very flexible option because of the portability of the interface, meaning you can easily transfer it from pc to pc without much fuss, and at the same time, the mixer can function standalone.

As an interface protocol, I find firewire to be better in terms of speed, number of channels and cpu loading, so I think firewire really is the better way to go. USB2 interfaces are just as good but at the expense of higher cpu loading. I'm waiting for reviews regarding the Toneport UX8 to verify this, but Roland's earlier UA-1000 and UA-101 bear out the fact that these USB2 interfaces work quite well.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: adler on October 17, 2007, 12:54:37 PM
sir ok po maganda po bang set up to? para sa track recording using pc?

guitar/bass/mics   --- 8 or 4 input mixer --- E-1-312 M-AUDIO Jam Lab Guitar USB Audio Interface ---- pc


 heres the link of the audio interface :

http://www.jbmusic.com.ph/product.php?sessid=&sid=25&pid=542

  1. kung ok lng po  ano ba magandang mixer?
  2. meron pa po bang kulang?
  3. kung mali po set up ,, ano po magandang alternative,, tight budget kc e.

salamat!

Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on October 17, 2007, 01:41:49 PM
The Jamlab only has a single 1/4" guitar input and no line inputs of any kind, making it useless to pair with a mixer as an audio interface. Save up for the 2496 Audiophile, or if you prefer usb, the Fast Trak USB: http://talk.philmusic.com/board/index.php/topic,62048.0.html

One alternative is the Behringer UCA-202 although I hear you might have to deal with latency issues.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: adler on October 17, 2007, 04:54:37 PM
salamat sa reply sir,, balak ko kasi gawin ko lng usb interface yung jamlab ,, tpos ung mixer ung ggwin ko kabitan ng inputs para sa drum mics.. ngpatanong ako sa behringer ala raw silang model na Behringer UCA-202 ..
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on October 17, 2007, 09:01:15 PM
salamat sa reply sir,, balak ko kasi gawin ko lng usb interface yung jamlab ,, tpos ung mixer ung ggwin ko kabitan ng inputs para sa drum mics.. ngpatanong ako sa behringer ala raw silang model na Behringer UCA-202 ..

Did you talk to the right behringer guy? eto yun: http://www.behringer.com/UCA202/index.cfm?lang=eng

Usually kasama ang UCA when you buy a Xenyx mixer from Behringer.

The Jamlab CANNOT be used to connect your mixer to the computer simply because it doesn't have line inputs, only a single guitar input. The mixer's outputs are line level out and it should be connected to a soundcard's line level inputs, which the Jamlab has none. Research carefully before you make an expensive mistake.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: adler on October 19, 2007, 05:24:35 PM
yup ,, nde nga po pde bilhin ung uca invididually, it comes with a mixer... salamat sir kitc..i will research more pa before consulting to you,,this thread is a big help to us beginers
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: faceless on October 20, 2007, 03:24:11 PM
sir i want to record guitar riffs and stuff ONLY(for now hehe)

m using an old ecs a530 laptop, 20gb hd and 384 RAM, mejo low end na, but i'm considering the guitar interface usb based gadgets(tama ba ung term?) like the M-AUDIO Jam Lab Guitar USB Audio Interface or the behringer guitar link UCG102.

are these good enough gadgets to record? any experiences with 'em? ano nga pla ang "latency" i usually read sa mga posts, but doesn't care to check.

 i'm kinda off with budget kaya m opting for the ucg102 though i still wanna hear your expert opinions on this. all i want is a straight plug and play recording.

tnx!  :-D
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on October 20, 2007, 04:40:30 PM
@faceless - most inexpensive laptops come with low rpm drives (4200 rpm). The fact that it is also 20 gigs means that you will fill it up rather quickly since audio files can take up a lot of space - approx 10 Mbytes per minute of 44.1 khz stereo. I highly recommend getting a larger capacity external drive, preferably firewire if your laptop has that port.

You can get by with the Behringer or the M-Audio if all you are concerned with is recording audio. I've read the specs of the M-Audio and it allows hardware monitoring, but it doesn't seem to allow DSP processing so you can't directly record a clean signal (while monitoring with effects) for later processing. Either you record your guitar wet with distortion, or you teach yourself how to record with a clean tone. One thing you should not do is to record with reverb and other time-based fx like delay; this can muddy up a mix very easily.

Good luck!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: faceless on October 20, 2007, 05:04:02 PM
thanks sir kit!

that's an awesome fast reply! :evil:
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on October 20, 2007, 06:00:13 PM
You're welcome, faceless.

I forgot to mention the reasons for an external drive. For one thing, slow internal drives usually mean low track counts. Most internal laptop drives are either 4200 or 5400 rpm, good for several tracks of audio, bad if you intend to push your system to something like 20 plus tracks. I highly recommend getting a 7200 rpm external drive. Make sure it is either firewire or USB2, usb 1.1 is too slow for audio. An alternative is to also replace your laptop's internal drive.

IMO, it is better to have an externally powered external drive rather than one that gets it's power from the FW or USB bus. Laptops have an unnerving way of saving power. You might even have to save up for some battery backup (a la APC) just in case the power goes out during a write. One of the things we want to avoid is data corruption and possible damage to the hard disk.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: faceless on October 20, 2007, 11:09:00 PM
oh thats's great! :evil:

i got an extra 80gb seagate@ 7200 rpm. however, are the external casing sold by cdr king OR COMPUTER SHOPS ok? ung mga naka usb, i can't remember if its usb 2.0 na pero i guess its powered by xternal source pa.

btw sir regarding latency sa previous post ko, what does it mean? i read stuff like "suffering from latency and all."..will the behringer suffer from latency? tama ba?

tnx again and more power!!!!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on October 20, 2007, 11:37:37 PM
Cdr-king is great for cheap products, but some of their items have a nasty habit of breaking exactly a day after the warranty expires. OTOH, I have one of their optical mouse (mice?) that's already 6 months old and still going strong. YMMV. This is your data you're talking about; try to get something with known reliability, and backup your data often. DVD-R's are cheap nowadays.

As for latency, that is the roundabout time it takes for audio to go into a soundcard, get processed by the software and cpu, then make it's way out of the soundcard for you to hear what you are recording (often called monitoring). This is directly related to your computer's processor, it's operating system, and the efficiency of your soundcard and it's drivers. Lower latency times place a higher load on your cpu; go low enough and your pc might throw in the towel and give up. A very good soundcard with very good drivers will likely give you very low latencies although there are always limits. ALL soundcards suffer from some form of latency, it's the nature of the beast. The trick is finding the right soundcard that is both affordable and efficient, and has what you need in terms of inputs and outputs. Behringer is somewhat new to the soundcard business and from what I've been reading about their UCA, the latency is somewhat high.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: in_the_tent on October 22, 2007, 08:37:43 AM
Hi guys. I'm not sure kung naitanong na ito sa mga thread dito. I've read the thread before pero baka di ko lang naintindihan kung meron mang info regarding this. I hope you'll be patient answering my questions. Please give some "IDIOT PROOF" answers oki? hehe.
i have a mixer (not a USB/Firewire) ang a PC at home. i think 1/8" ang input ng PC. (Please correct me if I'm wrong..) Ang out naman ng mixer ay 1/4". How do I connect my mixer to the PC?

mixer out(stereo) -
RCA-1/8" cable (with RCA-1/4" adapters) -
PC 1/8" input

tama ba ang connection na nasa isip ko? or do i need a gadget pa (interface ba yun?) to connect?

thanks for your extremely patient advice. :-D
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: maplesyrup on October 31, 2007, 06:40:40 PM
MGA KAPATID... BAGO LANG AKO SA LARANGAN NG DIGITAL RECORDING... KONTI LAMANG ANG NALALAMAN KO PATUNGKOL SA GANYANG MGA BAGAY! NAGBABALAK RIN AKO MAGTAYO BALANG ARAW NG AKING SARILING STUDIO..ANG KATANUNGAN KO PO AY GANITO... EHEM... ETO NA... ANONG MAGANDANG SET UP SA PERSONAL NA KOMPUTER KUNG ETO ANG AKING MGA NAPUPUSUANG GAMIT

1.PRESONUS FIREPOD
2.BEHRINGER ADA8000 UTRAGAIN PRO
3.BEHRINGER POWERPLAY PRO-8
4.ALESIS M1 MONITOR
5.AUDIX FUSION DRUM MICS
6.MXL990/991
7.SHURE SM57
8.SHURE SM58
at marami pang iba..





pasensya na kung masyadong tagalog ang aking pananalita.. alam kong puro maka engles ang mga tao dito..MULI.. pasensya napo! pinoy lang! sanay ma2lungan nyo ako! paki typ narin kung ano yung mga specs ng pc! cause u know! este... (tagalog nga pala!) " alam nyo na!

P.S macoy wag kana sumagot! alam kona sasagot mo! hahahaha! :-D
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: tam_guitar on November 02, 2007, 10:27:48 PM
ive read reviews on DAWs

adobe audition is not one of them...

why!?!?!

its always, cubase, sonar, etc...
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on November 02, 2007, 10:38:37 PM
@maplesyrup - do you have plans to record more than 8 simultaneous tracks? I don't think the firepod can accomodate the ADA8000 since it does not have adat capability. You need the Firestudio for 18 inputs (8 analog, 8 ADAT, 2 spdif) but research a bit on it's drivers and software compatibility. One of the biggest irritants with the Firepod is the lack of a software mixer, unlike it's little brother, the Firebox.

@tam_guitar - it's because Audition is audio only. I think one of the pre-requisites of being a full-fledged DAW is that it should also have midi capability.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: stilljey on November 03, 2007, 05:35:47 AM
sir kit the emu1212m comes with package includes 1010 pci card & 0202 i/o daugther card.  yung 0202 parang hindi naman sya pci (sa photo), so paano ang connection nya sa 1010. nag aaspire kasi ako to have one.

(http://i193.photobucket.com/albums/z223/reyjavik_bucket/EMU1212m.jpg)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: maplesyrup on November 03, 2007, 08:39:21 AM
MALI PA NA TYP KO... "FIRESTUDIO" PALA DAPAT.
SIR KITC ANO MASASABI MO SA FIRESTUDIO? OKS PABA DAGDAGAN NG ADA8000 YUN.. MUKHANG OK NAMAN NA ATA UNG 18 INPUTS SA RECORDING...
MEDYO NAGUGULUHAN KASI AKO DYAN SA (8 analog, 8 ADAT, 2 spdif)
PAKI EXPLAIN SIR...
PASENSYA NA KASI TALAGANG BAGO PALANG AKO NAG AARAL NG RECORDING,ALAM KO LANG UMUPO SA STUDIO AT PUMALO! EHEHEHE!


 :mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

PS. NATAPAKAN KO ATA UNG TANONG NI "in_the_tent" PAKI SAGOT NA LANG YUNG SA KANYA MUNA! PASENSYA NA.. BAKA BAWAL KASI MAGTANONG DITO PAG DIPA NASASAGOT YUNG TANONG NUNG NAUNA! PASENSYA NA ULIT!  
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on November 03, 2007, 09:39:37 AM
@stilljey - the 1212m comes with 2 cards: the main card is the 1010 which has the DSP and digital I/O; it is the pci card among the 2. The daughtercard, called the 0202, contains the 1/4" TRS balanced I/O... it is the analog I/O card, and it does not require connection to a free pci slot, only a free backplane slot in the pc case. The 0202 is connected via ribbon cable to the 1010 card.

@maplesyrup - maganda ang Firestudio on paper, pero I haven't been reading a lot of favorable reviews. According to some users, the Firestudio drivers are a bit quirky; my educated guess points to the firewire chipsets on some motherboards, YMMV. The Firestudio has ADAT ports allowing you to add the ADA8000, giving you a total of 16 analog I/O. ADAT and spdif are digital audio protocols; ADAT allows for 8 channels of audio on a single lightpipe (fiberoptic cable), while spdif is a 2-channel stereo protocol that can use optical (fiberoptic) or electrical (75-ohm coax) connections. Try to learn the specs of the gear you want to acquire. Mahirap na bibili ka ng gamit pero di mo alam kung tama para sa pangangailangan mo ang features niya.  :|

HTH!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: maplesyrup on November 03, 2007, 05:53:15 PM
salamat sir sa paliwanag... tlagang inaalam ko muna ung mga bibilihin ko! thats why i ask muna..mahirap kasi talaga magkamali! hindi rin kasi biro yung mga presyo nyan dito! kaya dapat magingat din sa pagbili! anywayz.. thanks again!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: stilljey on November 03, 2007, 06:11:23 PM
The 0202 is connected via ribbon cable to the 1010 card.

thanks sir, Im using S6PE at heto yung plano kong bilhin , Emu 1212M PCI 24-Bit/192kHz Balanced Interface (Windows) Mastering-grade 24-bit, 192kHz converters. Compatible ba sila at ma eedit ang midi?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: tam_guitar on November 03, 2007, 06:24:45 PM
@maplesyrup - do you have plans to record more than 8 simultaneous tracks? I don't think the firepod can accomodate the ADA8000 since it does not have adat capability. You need the Firestudio for 18 inputs (8 analog, 8 ADAT, 2 spdif) but research a bit on it's drivers and software compatibility. One of the biggest irritants with the Firepod is the lack of a software mixer, unlike it's little brother, the Firebox.

@tam_guitar - it's because Audition is audio only. I think one of the pre-requisites of being a full-fledged DAW is that it should also have midi capability.

but sir KitC,

i think that Audition is a powerful audio program...i think its unfair for adobe to be left behind.

hehe...

anyways. i have never tried to use cubase, sonar...etc.

can u pls give me a review on this softwares...if u dnt mind sir.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on November 03, 2007, 10:59:36 PM
thanks sir, Im using S6PE at heto yung plano kong bilhin , Emu 1212M PCI 24-Bit/192kHz Balanced Interface (Windows) Mastering-grade 24-bit, 192kHz converters. Compatible ba sila at ma eedit ang midi?

Well, I'm using the 1212's big brother, the 1820m and I swear by it. Let's just say that my soundstage opened up greatly when I moved to the Emu. You might have a better alternative in the 1212 since you are not tied to the 1820m's preamps, which though good, have exhibited some strange quirks.

The problem though is that Emu's parent company, Creative, is apparently in the middle of a financial crisis. While the Emu is a very good mid-level card, there are concerns about the company's longevity given Creative's financial woes. I suggest a wait-and-see approach or maybe try alternatives, like Echo's Audiofire, Presonus' Inspire, Edirol's UA and FA interfaces, or even Digidesign's Mbox2 mini, which are quite close in terms of price. That said, you won't find similar converters for the 1212's price, however.

@tam_guitar - while technically a DAW is supposed to mean Digital Audio Workstation so that means Audition falls within the confines of that definition, some others have decided to raise the bar on the definition by including the capability to process midi. If there's one thing you cannot do in Audition, it's edit a midi track. Sure you can import a midi file, but the most you can do is assign the track to a port but you cannot play softsynths or even edit out a note. As of Audition 2.0, I haven't seen any facility to manipulate midi data, which is the reason Audition sometimes isn't included in comparison with Cubase, Sonar and the like. Even FL and Ableton Live are more considered as DAW software because of their midi and audio capabilities.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: tam_guitar on November 03, 2007, 11:39:56 PM
Well, I'm using the 1212's big brother, the 1820m and I swear by it. Let's just say that my soundstage opened up greatly when I moved to the Emu. You might have a better alternative in the 1212 since you are not tied to the 1820m's preamps, which though good, have exhibited some strange quirks.

The problem though is that Emu's parent company, Creative, is apparently in the middle of a financial crisis. While the Emu is a very good mid-level card, there are concerns about the company's longevity given Creative's financial woes. I suggest a wait-and-see approach or maybe try alternatives, like Echo's Audiofire, Presonus' Inspire, Edirol's UA and FA interfaces, or even Digidesign's Mbox2 mini, which are quite close in terms of price. That said, you won't find similar converters for the 1212's price, however.

@tam_guitar - while technically a DAW is supposed to mean Digital Audio Workstation so that means Audition falls within the confines of that definition, some others have decided to raise the bar on the definition by including the capability to process midi. If there's one thing you cannot do in Audition, it's edit a midi track. Sure you can import a midi file, but the most you can do is assign the track to a port but you cannot play softsynths or even edit out a note. As of Audition 2.0, I haven't seen any facility to manipulate midi data, which is the reason Audition sometimes isn't included in comparison with Cubase, Sonar and the like. Even FL and Ableton Live are more considered as DAW software because of their midi and audio capabilities.

Sir KitC,

therefore...i will use AUDITION for audio editing and mastering, and FL STUDIO for MIDI editing...and drums...hehe

yah think itll work!?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on November 03, 2007, 11:47:50 PM
Sir KitC,

therefore...i will use AUDITION for audio editing and mastering, and FL STUDIO for MIDI editing...and drums...hehe

yah think itll work!?

Well, yeh... if you like moving continually between 2 programs. One of the reasons why I prefer Cubase and Sonar... no need to shift to another program when I have to edit audio and midi at the same time. One thing I do, however, is use an audio editing program like Wavelab to do my 'mastering'; these kinds of programs excel at this thing, and Audition (formerly CoolEdit) was and is an audio editing program at it's core.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: tam_guitar on November 04, 2007, 12:02:16 AM
oic

i understand now.

until i download sonar or cubase...il stick with FL STUDIO and AUDITION

btw, my soundcard is just a CREATIVE VALUE "something" card...


BTW

sir KITC,

i have the PSP VINTAGE WARMER plugin...its a compressor right!? u like!? i dont...i dnt knw y. :lol:
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on November 04, 2007, 01:30:30 AM
Download Sonar or Cubase?  :?

Careful... you know how we are about piracy here considering that a lot of us are registered users of the software we use. Instead of Sonar and Cubase, I suggest getting Reaper instead. It's uncrippled, unexpiring shareware, and it doesn't need a crack in order to operate. You can even run it off a thumbdrive since it is only a few megs, but it has capabilities that approach most major daw software.

Don't worry about the Value card... I had one a long time ago and it was quite sufficient for learning about recording and for doing demos; I learned how to make soundfonts (and subsequently sampling) on the darned thing. Plus, it's practically guaranteed to work with most games (semipro and pro soundcards can be less tolerant of gaming).
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: tam_guitar on November 04, 2007, 03:08:05 AM
piracy = bad

copy that!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: stilljey on November 04, 2007, 05:23:04 AM
Well, I'm using the 1212's big brother, the 1820m and I swear by it. Let's just say that my soundstage opened up greatly when I moved to the Emu. You might have a better alternative in the 1212 since you are not tied to the 1820m's preamps, which though good, have exhibited some strange quirks.

The problem though is that Emu's parent company, Creative, is apparently in the middle of a financial crisis. While the Emu is a very good mid-level card, there are concerns about the company's longevity given Creative's financial woes. I suggest a wait-and-see approach or maybe try alternatives, like Echo's Audiofire, Presonus' Inspire, Edirol's UA and FA interfaces, or even Digidesign's Mbox2 mini, which are quite close in terms of price. That said, you won't find similar converters for the 1212's price, however.
Ok Thanks sir, have a good day!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: tam_guitar on November 04, 2007, 08:45:02 PM
sir,

i purchase today a Sony MDR-V150 monitor headphone...it sucks!!! i hate it. maganda pa ung headphone na CDRKING

P1,400 ung price...

i wanna return it!!! do u think they will accept!?!?! AUTOMATIC CENTER

do u have any experience similar to this!?

bad comments:

muddy. too much mid. almost no high. espesyali kapag full band na!!! to much bass....its eating the whole audio! and the BOX SAYS "MONITOR HEADPHONE"

geez!!!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on November 04, 2007, 08:55:19 PM
I used to have the V600... that one really rocked. You might not be used to monitor headphones. For one thing, monitor-type headphones are not supposed to have hyped frequencies, often have a flat response. What you look for is accuracy in the reproduction of sounds and notes. Stereo imaging is always exaggerated when wearing headphones so do not use cans when making panning and reverb/fx decisions, you need monitor speakers for that.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: tam_guitar on November 04, 2007, 08:59:32 PM
ganun po ba ang monitor headphones!?!?!

tsk tsk...nganget talaga to eh...

btw, when using headphones as monitors...

ung master volume lagi 0db!? or higher...kasi basag to kapag malakas na...

ung windows mixer, todo lahat sir!?







i tested the SONY MONITOR HEADPHONE...at 15000Hz wala na ako marinig at 30Hz lang ang rinig...

is that ok!?

sabi sa specs frequency response ay 16-22,000Hz

 :?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on November 04, 2007, 09:04:56 PM
btw, when using headphones as monitors...

ung master volume lagi 0db!? or higher...

No. Use a level you're comfortable with. Always protect your hearing, unless of course you're Beethoven's reincarnation, then it won't matter if you go deaf.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: tam_guitar on November 04, 2007, 09:12:04 PM
i tested the altec lansing...kaya nya...20-20000Hz

ung headphone hnd...awww  :-(
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: in_the_tent on November 07, 2007, 04:31:52 PM
Hi guys. I'm not sure kung naitanong na ito sa mga thread dito. I've read the thread before pero baka di ko lang naintindihan kung meron mang info regarding this. I hope you'll be patient answering my questions. Please give some "IDIOT PROOF" answers oki? hehe.
i have a mixer (not a USB/Firewire) ang a PC at home. i think 1/8" ang input ng PC. (Please correct me if I'm wrong..) Ang out naman ng mixer ay 1/4". How do I connect my mixer to the PC?

mixer out(stereo) -
RCA-1/8" cable (with RCA-1/4" adapters) -
PC 1/8" input

tama ba ang connection na nasa isip ko? or do i need a gadget pa (interface ba yun?) to connect?

thanks for your extremely patient advice. :-D

mga kaforum.. bakit walang sumagot?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on November 07, 2007, 05:47:15 PM
mga kaforum.. bakit walang sumagot?

Let's put it this way... you can't be an idiot with these things. Somehow, someway, technology 'to, and you can't just allow yourself not to know about these things. Ignorance is how equipment gets trashed and good gear just gets wasted.

Judging from your pc, you're either connecting to the onboard inputs or a consumer gaming soundcard. If you're only concerned with recording demos and maybe a few ideas, you can get by with this pero if you're after some serious recording, don't waste your time and just get a better soundcard. As it is, you can only record 2 channels or a plain stereo mix from the mixer. Anything other than that will require a whole lot of perseverance from you.

Simply connect the 1/8" stereo y-cable from the pc to the mixer's main or control room outs... ok na yun.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: in_the_tent on November 07, 2007, 06:47:31 PM
thanks sa reply.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: guitaricci on November 10, 2007, 02:12:04 PM
Hi,

My setup is...

Guitar -> DI Box -> Laptop Soundcard
..the cable I will use will have an XLR plug (for DI Box out) on one end and a Stereo Plug (for Sound Card in) on the other end

Mawawala po ba yung pagka "balanced" nung signal from the DI box to the Laptop Soundcard dahil i-coconvert ko yung isang dulo ng XLR cable from XLR plug to stereo plug?  :? :?

Thanks...   :-)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on November 11, 2007, 02:16:16 AM
Mawawala po ba yung pagka "balanced" nung signal from the DI box to the Laptop Soundcard dahil i-coconvert ko yung isang dulo ng XLR cable from XLR plug to stereo plug?  :? :?

Definitely.

A DI's balanced output 'expects' to be connected to a balanced input. In a balanced connection, the same signal is present in pins 2 and 3, but with the signal in pin 3 is opposite in terms of phase polarity to the signal in pin 2. This has noise canceling properties with respect to the connecting cable, plus the signal is summed in the receiving device giving the added benefit of 6 dB of gain.  Converting a balanced signal to stereo defeats this purpose, plus summing the 2  channels to a stereo track will result in complete cancellation. Most DI's are designed for unbalanced line level input so there is also the issue of impedance mismatch when connecting a guitar to a typical DI box.

Rather than use a DI, get a pc interface that has guitar/instrument connections instead.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: LouieAzcona on November 23, 2007, 08:54:43 AM
andito pala yung Q & A.

Sir KitC, sorry kung kinulit kita sa kabila ah.

next week po bibilin na namin ung nirecoment niniyo MAudio 1010LT. analaking tulong po ng mga sagot ninyo! salamat!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: bugoy_king on December 14, 2007, 12:31:54 AM
KitC,

I would like to get your opinion on this probable set-up (for recording drums at home):

- Macbook 2.0 GhZ, 1GB RAM (upgradable)
- Logic Pro
- MOTU UltraLite Firewire Audio Interface (10 in, 14 out)
- studio monitors (most probably Behringer Truth 2031A)
- drum mics (haven't decided which, but leaning towards Shure)

Ok na ba yung ganitong set-up? Thanks!!!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on December 14, 2007, 12:41:04 AM
I don't see why not. I assume you have a good grasp of Logic, although for audio, it's pretty straightforward. Just don't ask me how to configure its Environment... it's like playing 3D chess.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: bugoy_king on December 14, 2007, 12:56:22 AM
Honestly, i don't, although I've managed to get a few really helpful tutorials from the Net, aside from browsing thru different fora regarding Logic.

Thanks for your quick reply!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: audiopanic on December 17, 2007, 02:48:16 PM
noob question po:

i've got a pc with

athlon x2 3400
asrock ALiveNF6G-VSTA (http://www.asrock.com/mb/overview.asp?Model=ALiveNF6G-VSTA)
2gb ddr2 533mhz ram
using built-in audio and video
40gb 5400rpm ide hdd

aside from getting another hdd (sata2), what else do i need to record guitar tracks for demo purposes with low latency? should i get a soundcard or a usb interface? i'll try out the reaper software too.

i've tried out this current setup with guitar tracks and i can't get decent real-time recording with my guitar.

suggestions naman po for the cheapest but acceptable setup.

thanks in advance!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: x_taxi on December 17, 2007, 03:10:59 PM
sir, subukan niyo po muna yun asio4all.  it's a free asio driver para maayos yun timin issues mo.  kung masaya ka na sa quality ng recording through your onboard, then you're set without havin to spend more.  HTH.

 :-) :-) :-)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: audiopanic on December 18, 2007, 02:53:05 PM
thanks! install ko mamaya sa bahay para masubukan!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: audiopanic on December 19, 2007, 08:21:03 AM
astig asio4all! parang real-time na mag-record! thanks for this tip! saved me a lot of money!

however, i experienced dropouts with guitar tracks pro and couldn't fix them. i switched to reaper and was able to record without any problems. looks like i'll be using that from now on.

thanks sa mga tips!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: solgimichki on December 21, 2007, 03:35:53 AM
iv been recording using my PC for quite some time now. usually guitar and voice lang. i run a pentium D and i use Sonar 4. my interface is the tascam us-122. latly i got a laptop to help me keep up sana wid recording on the road. and a very powerful laptop might i add. i picked my OS to be Windows Vista HE(home edition) and as it turns out hindi pala gumagana ang kahit anong music recording program sa Vista. not even my tascam can be installed.

my question is... can anyone tell me if there are any existing softwers for recording out there that can run in Vista? and if i were to get an new interface, what brand can format to Vista? please take this as a for-warning to all people that plan to upgrade their OS. VISTA CANNOT COMPLY WID ANY OLD RECORDING PROGMS or INTERFACES... believe me.. i've tried everything from pro tools to nuendo. ung pasok lang was Adobe Audition.. yuk...

thanx in advance!!!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on December 21, 2007, 07:56:26 AM
my question is... can anyone tell me if there are any existing softwers for recording out there that can run in Vista?

Sonar, beginning with version 5 and above, has been coded to take advantage of Vista specification, especially in areas of 64-bit operation. Try to upgrade to S5 or higher. Most other DAW software are being upgraded for Vista compatibility, albeit slowly.

Much harder is trying to find Vista drivers for a lot of gear, especially 64-bit drivers. Probably explains why blip.tv made this (http://blip.tv/file/340692/).

You will be better off using WinXP for DAW usage in the meantime.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: ecva on January 03, 2008, 05:20:27 PM
Hi mga sir/ma'am,

Makikitanong na po sana ako.

I have a PC and these are the specs:
Gigabyte P35-DQ6
Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600
2GB Corsair XMS2
Palit 8500GT
M-Audio Delta44
M-Audio Trigger Finger

Tanung lang po sana, ano po magandang mixer na i-pair sa delta44? I'm looking at the peavey pv6 mixer since I'm only going to be recording vocals lang and gusto ko sana yung maraming input options but it will only be recorded one track at a time. I'm also looking at behringer mixers. Ano po kaya mas maganda (based on mic pre-amps)?

And can I route the delta44's outputs to the mixer so I can monitor the output? How do I do that so I won't be looping the sounds coming in and out of the interface?

Salamat po ng marami.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: ETM(PHILS) on January 22, 2008, 11:19:11 PM
sir, subukan niyo po muna yun asio4all.  it's a free asio driver para maayos yun timin issues mo.  kung masaya ka na sa quality ng recording through your onboard, then you're set without havin to spend more.  HTH.

 :-) :-) :-)

sir question?

my PC specs (old)

hardware:
AMD duron 800 mhz
256 MB RAM
100 gb hd
creative soundcard

software:
reaper shareware

may delay nga ang recording ko a small msecond...  I just would like to ask kung ano po ba ang asio4all? anong advantage nya for recording? meron akong zoom asio nakainstall...

may sample ako ng recordings ko sa soundclick(my signature)

Thank you.






Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: wannabeguitarist on January 23, 2008, 07:15:58 AM
aspiring to do recording, what are the basic equipments I need? yung pang beginer lang. thanks
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: audiopanic on January 23, 2008, 08:13:59 AM
sir question?

my PC specs (old)

hardware:
AMD duron 800 mhz
256 MB RAM
100 gb hd
creative soundcard

software:
reaper shareware

may delay nga ang recording ko a small msecond...  I just would like to ask kung ano po ba ang asio4all? anong advantage nya for recording? meron akong zoom asio nakainstall...

may sample ako ng recordings ko sa soundclick(my signature)

Thank you.

sinubukan ko rin yung asio4all, as suggested. nagkaroon ng asio driver yung mga audio devices ko (sound card, zoom g2.1u) so instead na wdm, asio na gamit ko kaya nawala yung latency. nakakapagrecord na ako ng tracks realtime  kahit naka-playback yung ibang tracks - hindi ko magawa yun nung wala pa akong asio4all.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on January 23, 2008, 10:22:55 AM
@ETM(PHILS) - your pc is getting to be on the slow side for recording. First of all, your cpu is on the bare minimum needed for most present-day software to run plus you only have 256 megs of ram... XP just barely functions with that much ram. I suggest upgrading your ram to at least 512 megs; 1 gigabyte if you can afford it will be loads better. You will be hardpressed to find a cpu upgrade, but replacing your duron with an socket-A Athlon or even Sempron (if your mobo supports it) will give you additional processing horsepower.

The asio4all drivers are ok, but I got better performance using kxdrivers with soundblasters.

aspiring to do recording, what are the basic equipments I need? yung pang beginer lang. thanks

Most computers today have what you need to start recording; internal soundcard with line inputs and outputs, all you have to add is a mixer to be able to accept multiple inputs. Bear in mind that the onboard soundcard will have compromised sound quality so don't expect to release pro sounding recordings with that. You don't need a mixer if you already have equipment with suitable line outputs. Examples are keyboards and some digital guitar multifx, but if you want to record vocals, you will need a mic preamp and a mic of course. Behringer mixers are inexpensive enough for beginners and come with several mic preamps - some models even have built-in fx.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: LouieAzcona on January 23, 2008, 08:28:34 PM
sir kit, binabasa ko kasi mga previous posts niyo dito, ano po ba ibig sabihin ng paga-assemble ng PC depende sa software? paano po malalaman kung ano ang kailangan ng software? pano kung sonar 7 or protools?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on January 23, 2008, 09:08:05 PM
sir kit, binabasa ko kasi mga previous posts niyo dito, ano po ba ibig sabihin ng paga-assemble ng PC depende sa software? paano po malalaman kung ano ang kailangan ng software? pano kung sonar 7 or protools?

Sonar, for example, has a minimum requirement: at least 1 GHz processor with at least 256 megs of ram. Understand that if you follow these specs, your computer will most likely crawl or grind to a screeching stop if you follow this minimum so it's entirely reasonable to expect that you should multiply the minimum values by at least 1.5 if you want to be able to do SOME audio work with your computer. Add the fact that Sonar is windows only so this somehow directs your hardware choice, although you can run Sonar on a Mac using Bootcamp, albeit with a few limitations.

There are software that are dual platform, Cubase/Nuendo, in particular, so choosing either Steinberg product will give you some flexibility in choosing your computing platform. Other software such as Logic Pro and Digital Performer are Mac only so that definitely mitigates usage in a PC. ProTools is also dual platform, btw, but the HD version of PT is so very specific with hardware requirements that it's almost mandatory to use Macs in order to avoid hardware issues. That is not to say you can't run PT on windows, but Digidesign is really picky when it comes to windows hardware.

Another factor is the soundcard. Some motherboard chipsets have issues with soundcards. For example, if you intend to use a firewire audio interface, the firewire chipset of choice is Texas Instruments. This is not some urban legend, but was arrived at by several respected DAW builders who experienced glitches with other FW chipsets such as Via, Agere and Ricoh (although Via seems to be on the rebound lately). On the pci card side, Intel's P35 is emerging as the chipset of choice nowadays, superceding the former P965 and 975 chipsets. Another thing is that pci soundcards are SLOWWLLLYYY transitioning to pcie. Some mobos only have 2 pci slots while the newer Intel X38 and X48 mobos have absolutely none, so getting a pci soundcard for an X48 mobo is just plain... you know. One more thing... some soundcards, such as Apogee's Ensemble, are Mac only so that definitely dictates your choice of computer hardware.

DAW software developers usually publish a list of recommended soundcards for their products. Cakewalk, for example, has a list of approved soundcards and listed issues with some cards previously. Usually, this is not a problem since soundcard manufacturers often release driver updates to correct these issues.

If you want to see which soundcards are usually recommended with certain DAW software, go to their user forums. I lurked in the Cakewalk forums for a year before I developed my present DAW.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: LouieAzcona on January 23, 2008, 09:31:02 PM
If you want to see which soundcards are usually recommended with certain DAW software, go to their user forums. I lurked in the Cakewalk forums for a year before I developed my present DAW.

magandang inspiration ito. salamat po!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: wannabeguitarist on January 24, 2008, 02:01:28 AM
Quote
Most computers today have what you need to start recording; internal soundcard with line inputs and outputs, all you have to add is a mixer to be able to accept multiple inputs. Bear in mind that the onboard soundcard will have compromised sound quality so don't expect to release pro sounding recordings with that. You don't need a mixer if you already have equipment with suitable line outputs. Examples are keyboards and some digital guitar multifx, but if you want to record vocals, you will need a mic preamp and a mic of course. Behringer mixers are inexpensive enough for beginners and come with several mic preamps - some models even have built-in fx.

Thanks!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: dorothegreat on January 27, 2008, 01:55:00 PM
sir kit, magandang araw po, ok lang po ba na gumamit ng USB soundcard ng cdr-king para sa input (guitar) at the same time ay may soundcard? salamat po.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on January 27, 2008, 04:25:47 PM
sir kit, magandang araw po, ok lang po ba na gumamit ng USB soundcard ng cdr-king para sa input (guitar) at the same time ay may soundcard? salamat po.

Pwede, pero it depends on which drivers your DAW is using. Asio, for example, accesses only one device at a time so you cannot use your usb guitar input at the same time as the pci or onboard soundcard. You can access multiple soundcards using wdm, but your latency can be much higher overall plus the lack of clock sync between the 2 devices.

Monitoring is often a problem when using 2 soundcards simultaneously unless you have a mixer for combining both soundcard's outputs. In my experience, asio often gives better latency performance, but I suggest experimenting with your setup to find out which is more efficient.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on January 27, 2008, 04:26:05 PM
sir kit, magandang araw po, ok lang po ba na gumamit ng USB soundcard ng cdr-king para sa input (guitar) at the same time ay may soundcard? salamat po.

Pwede, pero it depends on which drivers your DAW is using. Asio, for example, accesses only one device at a time so you cannot use your usb guitar input at the same time as the pci or onboard soundcard. You can access multiple soundcards using wdm, but your latency can be much higher overall plus the lack of clock sync between the 2 devices.

Monitoring is often a problem when using 2 soundcards simultaneously unless you have a mixer for combining both soundcard's outputs. In my experience, asio often gives better latency performance, but I suggest experimenting with your setup to find out which is more efficient.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: dorothegreat on January 27, 2008, 05:58:00 PM
sir kit, Guitar Tracks Pro 3 at SONAR 6 Producer Edition po meron ako, may asio4all din naka-install, ung soundcard ko po e CMI8738/c3dx, pangrecord lang po ng mga demo ang balak ko.live guitar track tapos PC DRUMMER PRO ang source ng drum tracks, di po kaya ako magkaproblema sa mixing ng 2 tracks + bass tracks? salamat po.

nga pala, advise n din po kung dapat po e guitar straight to pc (tapos use plug-ins na lang) or mag-fx na po ako between guitar and pc? :-D

Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: inot1227 on February 05, 2008, 02:41:33 PM
Hi Kit,

im planning to start some intial guitar recording on my laptop,
is the E-MU 1616 enough?
i can do complete,album quality recording with it?
To do complete music recording with it,
i can get/produce all the drums, bass & vocals just from using it?

thanks,
in0t
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on February 05, 2008, 05:06:06 PM
nga pala, advise n din po kung dapat po e guitar straight to pc (tapos use plug-ins na lang) or mag-fx na po ako between guitar and pc? :-D

For some strange reason, your post did not get marked as 'unread', sorry if I just answered today.

Your should have no problem multitracking with either GT Pro or Sonar. Your chosen soundcard is not the best, though. It might be wise to replace it with something better.

As for recording guitar straight to pc, we do it a lot at PIMP and use plugins, but we route guitars through a DI before going into the soundcard. This is to prevent tonesuck; you can also use a preamp like the ART Tube MP or Behri Mic200 which has DI capabilities.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on February 05, 2008, 05:12:24 PM
im planning to start some intial guitar recording on my laptop,
is the E-MU 1616 enough?
i can do complete,album quality recording with it?

While the 1616 is a very good interface, remember that you can only access 6 analog inputs in it's most basic configuration; you will have to expand it with an 8-channel preamp with ADAT outputs to be able to increase it's I/O capability.

As is, the Emu converters are quite good but I heard you can make them sound even better by using a very good external clock such as Apogee's Big Ben or Lucid's Master Clock. I've been considering Black Lion Audio's clock for my 1820m.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: wannabeguitarist on February 06, 2008, 03:33:57 AM
Hi sir kit,

I'm currently recording using my zoom G7, cubase and laptop..questions po...
1. How can I convert the recorded music to audio?
2. Can I use zoom G7 to record the vocals

Hope you can help me...

Thanks!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on February 06, 2008, 03:51:25 AM
I'm currently recording using my zoom G7, cubase and laptop..questions po...
1. How can I convert the recorded music to audio?

Once the audio is in Cubase, just export the track/s to wav. Set the left and right markers and highlight the tracks you want to export; mute the tracks you don't want. Of course, perform any mixing and editing prior to exporting. Once you have a wav mixdown, you can convert it to mp3 or burn to cd accordingly.

2. Can I use zoom G7 to record the vocals?

No, although in theory, you can use an unbalanced mic through your G7 if you want to risk it. I don't recommend going that route if you want and need clean sounding vocals. You will need a separate audio interface, preamp and mic to record vocals... or do what I used to do: record a guide track, go to a studio with a great mic, record all vox and dubs there then bring home the tracks (raw) and perform final mixdown at home.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: wannabeguitarist on February 06, 2008, 04:00:11 AM
I see... Thanks!!!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: dorothegreat on February 06, 2008, 12:35:12 PM
ok lang po sir kit.

maraming salamat po sa reply :-D
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: titser_marco on February 24, 2008, 05:43:59 PM
Chief,

I have a Delta 44 coming in and I was wondering if it could sync with another Delta 44. I've googled the thing up and I've been getting confusing answers because some say it's fine while some say it's not possible because of the lack of an SPDIF out and in. Please advise. Thanks!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on February 26, 2008, 01:29:28 PM
I have a Delta 44 coming in and I was wondering if it could sync with another Delta 44. I've googled the thing up and I've been getting confusing answers because some say it's fine while some say it's not possible because of the lack of an SPDIF out and in. Please advise. Thanks!

From what I know about Maudio, the 44's will sync via their drivers. Unfortunately, the configuration will most likely be 8 simultaneous inputs but only 4 outs accessible via a single card/breakout box. For some strange reason, not all 8 outputs are simultaneously available. Can someone pls. confirm?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: audionoob on February 27, 2008, 06:00:14 AM
Usually may preamp na ang mixer. Usually the number of XLR inputs equals the number of available preamps. Make sure that the number of preamps are what you need. Most mixers under 16 channels only have 2 to 6 preamps, which may be insufficient for your needs. If you decide on a 12-channel mixer with only 4 preamps, for ex., you can supplant those with external preamps connected to the line inputs such as the MIC200 or TubeMP.

hello po. sorry for quoting an old post. My boss recently setup a small studio for recording solo vocals (as a hobby), the problem now was that, i was thrust into taking care of it without any knowledge of audio recording using hardware such as mixers, condenser mics, etc. (except maybe connecting headphone-outs of cassette players to line-ins of sound cards for transferring audio-tapes to CDs) so i have a few questions:

1. my boss already have a mixer (MEKSE MR2012 (http://www.mekse.cl/productsmixer.htm)), a condenser mic (Samson C01), and a PC. The technician who set the connections told us that the mixer doesn't have the ability to provide phantom power to the mic so we can't use it. If we are to use a mic-preamp and attached that to the mixer, will it work? the cheapest mic-preamp we can find is the M-Audio Buddy Mic Preamp, is this ok for voice+music recordings to PC?

basic setup would be?

condenser mic --> mic-preamp --> mixer --> PC (onboard sound) --> software
                                                         \
                                                          +--> amplifier --> speaker (monitor)


(http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y233/nubianxp/th_PDR_0146Large.jpg) (http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y233/nubianxp/PDR_0146Large.jpg)


2. another question, how can i record the vocals separate from the music on the PC? is it okay to pan the vocals to the right and the music to the left so i can get separate tracks on my recording? that way i can easily edit the vocals without affecting the music and vice versa? is this possible? or what's the best method without requiring any additional hardware? i'm using Audacity BTW as my recording software.

3. Any methods of controlling the volume going to the PC? Should I max the volume sliders and trim the volume in mixer?

a bit off-topic...

4. Any thread for posting sample recordings and get some inputs on what needs to be enhanced, removed, added, etc.?

sorry, but i really have no idea about studio recordings and equipment :(
but would really like to learn.

Thanks for any help.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: luin_theblue on March 04, 2008, 09:53:32 AM
Butting in... Hehe.

For those who have tube preamps, I highly suggest you replace the stock tubes with branded ones because it's a big, big steal and improves sound quality a gazillion times more. I changed the tubes of my ART Tube Preamp (Chinese 12ax7 stock) and Behringer MIC100 (Behringer 12ax7 hand-selected stock) to Tung-Sols from MF and they are very round, quiet, and warm. I feel like when I record vocals, the singer's/speaker's voice gets sucked into the mic, through the preamps, and into the system. Hehe.

Just my two cents.  :mrgreen:

Now I have a question, my motherboard has HD audio which is incompatible with my Alesis firewire mixer (12-channels). Should I get a soundcard OR turn my mixer into the soundcard (software is Sonar 6 Home Studio)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on March 04, 2008, 11:26:41 AM
Now I have a question, my motherboard has HD audio which is incompatible with my Alesis firewire mixer (12-channels). Should I get a soundcard OR turn my mixer into the soundcard (software is Sonar 6 Home Studio)

Disable onboard sound if you're not using it. HD audio normally is 5.1 and the rear panel inputs only offer limited I/O. You get more inputs when using the Alesis directly; the mixer becomes the soundcard. Just make sure about the firewire chipset on your mobo - Via firewire has proven to be problematic for some people in the past, with TI firewire chipsets often recommended.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: luin_theblue on March 04, 2008, 11:30:16 AM
Firewire is a PCI card no prob.

 :mrgreen:
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on March 04, 2008, 01:34:54 PM
Firewire is a PCI card no prob.

That may still be a problem is the chipset on the card is Via, Agere or sometimes, Ricoh. Like I said, the FW chipset has to be TI. Even then, you have to make sure that the FW card isn't a combi 1394a/1394b card (FW400/800) - even TI chips have proven to be problematic with these 'combi' cards. Better to use solo FW400 TI chip cards. Certain high end mobos offer TI FW onboard, among them Gigabyte , Asus and Abit.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: luin_theblue on March 04, 2008, 01:40:02 PM
That may still be a problem is the chipset on the card is Via, Agere or sometimes, Ricoh. Like I said, the FW chipset has to be TI. Even then, you have to make sure that the FW card isn't a combi 1394a/1394b card (FW400/800) - even TI chips have proven to be problematic with these 'combi' cards. Better to use solo FW400 TI chip cards. Certain high end mobos offer TI FW onboard, among them Gigabyte , Asus and Abit.

Mine's an Inno3d firewire card (2 external,1 internal firewire ports). I bought it before only thinking video editing in my head. Would you know if this would cause problems?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on March 04, 2008, 01:49:42 PM
Mine's an Inno3d firewire card (2 external,1 internal firewire ports). I bought it before only thinking video editing in my head. Would you know if this would cause problems?

I doubt you will find TI on inexpensive FW cards. The only way to find out if the Inno3D will give you problems is to try it out with the Alesis (I'm sure Inno uses Via). First thing to do is to put the FW card in a slot that does not share an IRQ with anything! That alone will solve a lot of problems but will not solve a bad chipset problem.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: in_the_tent on March 11, 2008, 12:26:32 AM
simple question.. kapag ang gagamitin for recording ay webcam mic, kelangan pa ba ng software para marecord?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on March 11, 2008, 01:10:12 AM
simple question.. kapag ang gagamitin for recording ay webcam mic, kelangan pa ba ng software para marecord?

If you're recording to video (pron, maybe?), then the video capture software normally records audio with the video. But if you only want to capture audio, you will need some form of audio recording software - even simple Sound Recorder will do. Remember that this mic will most likely only have directsound/wdm drivers and latency might be a problem.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on March 11, 2008, 01:10:21 AM
simple question.. kapag ang gagamitin for recording ay webcam mic, kelangan pa ba ng software para marecord?

If you're recording to video (pron, maybe?), then the video capture software normally records audio with the video. But if you only want to capture audio, you will need some form of audio recording software - even simple Sound Recorder will do. Remember that this mic will most likely only have directsound/wdm drivers and latency might be a problem.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: in_the_tent on March 11, 2008, 11:02:04 AM
If you're recording to video (pron, maybe?), then the video capture software normally records audio with the video. But if you only want to capture audio, you will need some form of audio recording software - even simple Sound Recorder will do. Remember that this mic will most likely only have directsound/wdm drivers and latency might be a problem.
ano po yung pron?

so i still need to buy a video capture software? o kasama na yun nung uninstall ang A4TECH webcam ko sa pc?

Is "SOUND RECORDER" a name of a software? san binibili ito? mga how much? o downloadable ba ito? how about yung KRISTAL? Me nadownload ako eh. free daw. legal naman ho yun right? di ko lang alam gamitin pa.:)

noted po ung sa latancy.

thanks sir kit for your kind reply.:)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on March 11, 2008, 11:20:59 AM
ano po yung pron?

pron is webspeak for P--N (invert pron's 2 middle letters). Amateur productions of this video 'artform' have greatly increased since they introduced webcams into most peoples bedrooms (or kitchens or living rooms or bathrooms, basements, trees in backyards...  you get the picture).

so i still need to buy a video capture software? o kasama na yun nung uninstall ang A4TECH webcam ko sa pc?

Depends if the camera came with some rudimentary video capture software. Windows usually has Movie Maker which can capture video and audio (look in the Accessories folder).

Is "SOUND RECORDER" a name of a software? san binibili ito? mga how much? o downloadable ba ito? how about yung KRISTAL? Me nadownload ako eh. free daw. legal naman ho yun right? di ko lang alam gamitin pa.:)

You can find Sound Recorder in the Accessories folder; it is a very rudimentary audio recording program built into windows. You can also use Kristal, Audacity and any other software as long as it can access the webcam mic via windows drivers. Usually you will have to assign the mic as the default audio input device in window's Sound Control Panel.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: marikukuk on March 18, 2008, 01:37:49 AM
sir what kind of software the name exactly would you recomend? and where can i score one? can i download it from the net? pls tell me how tnx!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: wannabeguitarist on March 18, 2008, 02:50:44 AM
Hi Sir KitC,

question...I was able to record using my g7.1, pc and cubase, but when i played it via my pc or ipod, the sound volume is low. What do i need to adjust duirng recording to resolve this? Thanks in advance!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on March 18, 2008, 12:24:22 PM
question...I was able to record using my g7.1, pc and cubase, but when i played it via my pc or ipod, the sound volume is low. What do i need to adjust duirng recording to resolve this? Thanks in advance!

Well, one thing you should always do is check levels prior to pressing the record button. Normally, I like to set levels to 0 dB for EVERYTHING, including the soundcard's control panel/mixer, then adjust things from there. If you have the volume faders slammed full on and you're still getting low levels, then it's time to check your signal chain - most likely you have external equipment that is outputting low levels or even a defective cable.

Another thing to check is your monitoring; you might have your monitors at too loud levels forcing you to overcompensate your recording levels. I will repeat, set your soundcard to 0 dB for both input and output, then adjust your monitors and your preamp levels from there.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: haey2 on March 26, 2008, 11:51:00 PM
sir KitC...newbie po in home recording...i just wanted to have some "demo" recordings as my equipments are very limited;

PC w/ jamlab installed
tube amp
guitar effects

>how can i connect  my tube amp to my PC in order to record it decently?
>which "affordable" software can you recommend for a hobbyist like me?

i'll mostly record guitar tracks lang naman...thanks in advance... 8-) 8-) 8-)




Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: diosa! on April 03, 2008, 10:13:44 PM
sir KitC...newbie po in home recording...i just wanted to have some "demo" recordings as my equipments are very limited;

PC w/ jamlab installed
tube amp
guitar effects

>how can i connect  my tube amp to my PC in order to record it decently?
>which "affordable" software can you recommend for a hobbyist like me?

i'll mostly record guitar tracks lang naman...thanks in advance... 8-) 8-) 8-)


pm me and ill give you free basic tips. :oops:





Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on April 03, 2008, 10:42:38 PM
@haey - Sorry if I haven't replied sooner... I can see that a goddess has decided to advice you via PM.

Anyway, from what I know about Jamlab, you connect your guitar directly to the interface without any need for an amp. This is advantageous in that you don't have to go through the motions of miking an amp (and possibly disturbing the neighbors or other members of the family), and secondly, you have a potentially quieter signal path. Disadvantages are that you cannot record a direct signal and an amp at the same time... you are forced to use amp sims with Jamlab to get your tone. At least it has a headphone/line out giving you low latency monitoring although I'm not exactly sure if it is hardware monitoring.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: haey2 on April 03, 2008, 11:09:28 PM

@diosa! - sent you a pm....thanks in advance 8-)

@KitC - no worries sir...the guitar recording that I get thru the "jamlab" seems to be decent enough for me to use as a demo... I was just thinking if I could record the tone that I get from the tube amp, as it sounds better in my ears...thanks again sir KitC... 8-)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on April 03, 2008, 11:31:01 PM
I was just thinking if I could record the tone that I get from the tube amp, as it sounds better in my ears...

I'm thinking it would since the Jamlab amp sims aren't it's strongest suit.

I would recommend getting a multiple input interface if you want to simultaneously record the guitar direct signal plus your amp. This would entail adding equipment like a DI, mixer and mic if you're going for a miked setup. The DI will serve as a splitter allowing you to send a direct signal to your interface while another goes to your amp.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: pizarro84 on April 08, 2008, 07:55:13 AM
Just a little newbie question sirs, can I directly connect a balanced dynamic microphone to my computer's line-in?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: blueweller on April 09, 2008, 08:58:08 AM
Hello everyone!

Here's my newbie question:

Since last year I've always wanted to start and learn recording music via my pc. But because of budget reasons it was delayed. Now that I feel I can pursue (and afford) this dream/goal I want to know what are the basics that needs to be attached or installed to my pc before I begin? I've heard so much about the m-audio interface (fastrack) but is this enough to start recording? What about where to plug in the guitar, mics, bass, etc...? I'm also planning to use Abelton live 7.0.3 is this any good? I was able to download the demo and I find it ok but if you have something else let me know too. What else do I need? Nothing complicated just something to produce good music will do but I'm very much open to alot of suggestions. Sorry to ask so many questions and I'm sure this has been asked a thousand times before but I just wanna learn this so much.

Thanks in advance.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: sound formula on April 10, 2008, 08:33:33 PM
good day! i am bothered by pops from the monitor speakers that occur when we play the recorded tracks when we mix. it happens especially when we play the mix of songs with relatively more tracks (say, more than 20) and songs in which we use more plug-ins for. I recently added 1GB RAM because i thought this will solve the problem but unfortunately, it didn't. my present set-up is an Intel dual core processor 2.8GHz, 2GB RAM, 64MB Video Card. I use an M-Audio Delta 1010LT PCI Recording Interface and my software is Sony Vegas 6. It really bothers me when the pops occur. Could you please help me remedy this? Thank you.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: diosa! on April 12, 2008, 10:40:03 PM
guys, ongoing is the clearance sale  on all m-audio products at jb music. for more info call or text 09272008383/09186106561/09228171590. :oops:
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on April 17, 2008, 07:30:26 PM
@pizarro84 - No, you cannot connect a balanced mic directly to your pc's line ins.

@blueweller - the fasttrack can be good if you are recording a stereo track or 2 mono channels simultaneously. Anything more than 2 channels and you will need a multichannel soundcard or use a mixer to submix everything to stereo. I also use Ableton Live but if you intend to treat your computer as a sort of tape recorder, Ableton Live may be not what you need. I like Live for the fact that it's very easy to make rearrangements, but it has a tendency to shorten audio clips to fit the tempo of your project unless you set Live's preferences properly. You can use Live similarly to Sonar and Cubase although it's working paradigm is different from either program.

@sound formula - ram isn't so much a factor during recording, your processor is more than enough for the task. One thing to look at would be your hard disk; either it's fragmented or too slow for the job. Another thing is to record with as little plugins active as possible. Also, check your soundcard latency settings - it might be set too low even for your cpu.

hth,
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: blueweller on April 21, 2008, 05:55:59 AM
Thanks sa advise Sir Kit! But for a novice like me and who's just starting from scratch will you recommend the fast track right away?

Thanks!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: kaloyster on April 21, 2008, 09:13:58 AM
@blueweller, I'm no KitC but I can recommend you the Fast Track Pro. Like you I'm a newbie as well in the audio recording field and I'm getting good results with my Fast Track.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on April 21, 2008, 03:51:07 PM
Thanks sa advise Sir Kit! But for a novice like me and who's just starting from scratch will you recommend the fast track right away?

I'd say it's a safe bet to go with known brands. One more thing, make sure that the inputs (and outputs) are sufficient for your needs. The new Fast Track Pro looks like a good multi-input card but I'm thinking it's pricey.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: titser_marco on April 22, 2008, 11:22:24 PM
Help!

I'm planning to run the following software on my PC using a Delta 44 Soundcard:

Sibelius 4
Reaper + A lot of freeware softsynths and VST effects
Sound Forge
Cool Edit Pro

all of which would be running on Windows XP.

What specs should I look for? I'm off to go to Gilmore to get the following:

Processor
Motherboard
RAM
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on April 23, 2008, 12:16:52 AM
@titser - if budget isn't much of a problem, Intel is the better bet in terms of performance. You have a choice from the E21xx series up to the quad core Q6xxx series. The Delta 44 is a pci card so you need a mobo with at least 3 pci slots. Right now, the Intel P35 chipset is proven for DAW use so that leaves you with the Gigabyte GA P35-DS3, Abit IP35 and MSI P35 Neo3. Get at least 1 gig of ram, preferably dual channel. 2 gigs of DDR2 800 ram cost P2.3k - cost effective and high performance at the same time.

hth,
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: pizarro84 on April 29, 2008, 04:02:30 AM
Salamat po sir kit  :-) ngayun ko lang nabasa
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: Peter North on June 05, 2008, 03:58:39 PM
Sir Kit,

I'm planning to record my band. I have an ASUS laptap, core 2 duo, 2 gig of memory, 160 gig hard disk. I'm planning of buying an Alesis Firewire Multimix 12, would this be enough to record drums? How many tracks will appear on my laptap?

pasensya na po, bagito pa ako sa larangan ng recording.

Salamat ng marami.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on June 05, 2008, 06:40:27 PM
You can get up to 12 tracks with the Alesis FW Multimix 12. Just make sure your laptop's FW chipset is up to the task since some onboard FW chips have issues with audio - verify first with Alesis for possible compatibility problems. If so, you might have to invest in a pcmcia or expresscard firewire expansion.

If you use a 4-mic setup for drums, you should have no problems recording an entire band. Note that the Multimix's other channels are ganged to stereo faders as well as being line level inputs only. Unless you have additional preamps for mics, you are limited to the 4 mic preamps in the multimix.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: britesynth on June 05, 2008, 09:14:01 PM
kung may 15k ako at gusto ko sana mag upgrade ng pc, alin po kaya dapat ko unahin palitan?

(specs???)
motherboard?...
processor?...
memory?...
soundcard?... (alin mas ok internal or external? - kung external ano advisable?)
15k lang muna po ah ang budget, wala po kasi ako mashado alam pag dating sa specs ng mga pc o laptop,

vocals lang halos ang kelangan irecord ng live (kahit home recording lang o pang demo lang shempre mas maganda kung malinis) yung music sa softwares na, suggestions?  :? thanks!  :-D 
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: Peter North on June 06, 2008, 01:14:36 PM
Thanks a lot Sir Kit!

I've read some infos about alesis multimix firewire products and it appears that there are many issues about them. I'm having second thoughts of acquiring one. Anyway, right now i have a mixer with 24 mic preamps (China made mixer). How can i make use of this  mixer to record our songs to my laptap? what would be the minimal interface (don't know if its the right term) that i should buy?

Thanks ulit sir.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on June 06, 2008, 07:35:29 PM
@britesynth - 15k will not get you very far since a mobo and cpu will already set you back about 9k. That leaves you very little for other peripherals unless you are going to re-use some peripherals like drive/s, burners, and the case. It's often recommended to use at least 500w PSUs with the newer boards even though they are energy efficient; most audio computer have at least 2 hard disks and burners as well as lots of ram and an efficient fan system, so the PSU wattage is justified.

@Peter North - it depends on your mixer configuration. Some 24 channel mixers come in 4-buss or 8-buss configurations which can help you with your soundcard choice, e.g., pair a 4-buss mixer with a 4-input soundcard. I still maintain that if you can afford an interface with at least 8 inputs, the better - you never know when the additional inputs will come in handy. There are loads of firewire interfaces out there from Presonus, Focusrite... even A.R.T. has the Tubefire which pairs 8 of it's TubeMP preamps with a firewire interface. Even Phonic has a firewire mixer similar to Alesis. For the record, we have used an Alesis FW Multimix8 with no problems other than 8 channels is too limiting for our needs - ask xjepoyx for our experience with the Multimix.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: carl20 on June 07, 2008, 09:15:25 AM
Thanks a lot Sir Kit!

I've read some infos about alesis multimix firewire products and it appears that there are many issues about them. I'm having second thoughts of acquiring one. Anyway, right now i have a mixer with 24 mic preamps (China made mixer). How can i make use of this  mixer to record our songs to my laptap? what would be the minimal interface (don't know if its the right term) that i should buy?

Thanks ulit sir.

M-Audio delta 1010LT try mo
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: Peter North on June 07, 2008, 09:53:53 AM
Again, many thanks Sir Kit.

Ok, i've already asked my cousin in canada to buy me stuff for my home studio. Here's what i've search in ebay so far.

Alesis Multimix 12 firewire - C$ 285.41
Phonic *Helix 18 Firewire b* MKII - C$ 304.83

Given the above products, what would be your recommendation?

Thanks ulit sa walang sawang pagtugon sa aking kakulitan.. hehehehe

God Bless
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on June 07, 2008, 10:11:17 AM
I'm not saying that one is better than the other, but the Phonic has 8 mic preamps compared to Alesis' 4, and the Phonic includes Cubase LE - I'd say it's the better deal.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: Peter North on June 07, 2008, 11:35:08 AM
thank you very much sir kit.

you're d man!

Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: star on June 07, 2008, 12:56:21 PM
sir ako BUDGET ko po 25k.. khit wala munang sound card...
ano po ba exact specs  kelangan ko...

MOBO - ?
CPU    - ?
RAM   - ?
HD     - ?
V-card- ?

yung mga hindi ko po nabanggit meron na po ako..  :lol: :wink:

sa sound card naman po budget ko 15k ano po mairecomend nyo?
pang house recording lang po.... my mixer na kmi SL2442 behringer.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on June 08, 2008, 01:01:58 PM
sir ako BUDGET ko po 25k.. khit wala munang sound card...
ano po ba exact specs  kelangan ko...

Next to the software, the soundcard is the most important element you should take into consideration when building your audio computer. That said, based on present chipsets, use an Intel P35 or X38 chipset. Most brands are ok although there have been DPC latency issues with Gigabyte mobos. One thing you should consider is if the mobo is quad core (or more) ready. Unfortunately, the upcoming Nehalem cpu architecture is incompatible the present 775 mobos in the market today.

For ram, get 2 gigs at least DDR2-800. Seagate drives have proven to be quite reliable, get SATA drives (if getting SATAII, make sure your mobo is capable). Vidcard? Any medium powered card will do, you don't need highpowered 8800GTs or 3870 SLI systems for audio work.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: row on June 15, 2008, 03:14:09 PM
help naman. would i rather set up my pc for recording or do it w/ a recording studio? im planning to record my compositions po and independently produce my own record. thanks poh.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jay_burn on June 23, 2008, 12:48:40 AM
hello.. i recently bought an Alesis Firewire Multimix 8 and an ADS Tech PYRO PCI 64R2 Firewire Card.  now i'm planning to build a pc for my planned home recording studio. is this specs ok?
Intel E4600
Gigabyte ga-p35-ds3l
320gb Seagate sata
2x1gb kingston 800 ddr2
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: carl20 on June 25, 2008, 04:40:53 PM
hello.. i recently bought an Alesis Firewire Multimix 8 and an ADS Tech PYRO PCI 64R2 Firewire Card.  now i'm planning to build a pc for my planned home recording studio. is this specs ok?
Intel E4600
Gigabyte ga-p35-ds3l
320gb Seagate sata
2x1gb kingston 800 ddr2


oks na yan laban na yan!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jamming_papu on June 26, 2008, 02:16:45 AM
hello.. i recently bought an Alesis Firewire Multimix 8 and an ADS Tech PYRO PCI 64R2 Firewire Card.  now i'm planning to build a pc for my planned home recording studio. is this specs ok?
Intel E4600
Gigabyte ga-p35-ds3l
320gb Seagate sata
2x1gb kingston 800 ddr2


not just ok but good. with that memory and processor, simultaneous multi-track won't have a problem. ... i think. i have a 1 gb and all seems well in 3 tracks simultaneous. a 2gb would definitely be better. with a 320 gb SATA, you would probably not worry so much of the big space which audio tracks makes.  :-D
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on June 27, 2008, 11:53:42 AM
not just ok but good. with that memory and processor, simultaneous multi-track won't have a problem. ... i think. i have a 1 gb and all seems well in 3 tracks simultaneous. a 2gb would definitely be better. with a 320 gb SATA, you would probably not worry so much of the big space which audio tracks makes.  :-D

Experience has taught me that it's better to have 2 or more physical drives instead of just one. Even if you partition a large drive, when you lose the MBR, that drive is format material and you lose all your data. Better to have a small sized system drive (say, 80 gigs) and leave the large drive for your data.

It also pays to backup your projects every once in a while - that why I have a couple of external drives strictly for backing up all my projects, among other stuff  :wink: . Think of it... just because the MTBF (mean time between failures) says 1 million hours, it doesn't mean your drive will last that long. Mean time is just the average between 1 hour of flawless operation and 2 million hours before any particular drive... fails.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jamming_papu on June 28, 2008, 02:27:51 AM
thanks for another idea sir kit. i'll be saving my finish master track and some important single tracks on a cd then.  :-D
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: titser_marco on July 12, 2008, 08:43:38 PM
What's a good FW PCI card? I'm thinking of getting an M-Audio FW1814 kasi.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on July 14, 2008, 09:41:35 AM
What's a good FW PCI card? I'm thinking of getting an M-Audio FW1814 kasi.

Look for a FW card with a Texas Instruments chipset if you want the least problems. bindoy was selling one in the classifieds not too long ago.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: titser_marco on July 14, 2008, 10:03:40 AM
Look for a FW card with a Texas Instruments chipset if you want the least problems. bindoy was selling one in the classifieds not too long ago.

Boss, I just looked it up, and he's selling a PCMCIA card. I need one san for my PCI slot.

Is it really impossible to work with a Via chipset? I'm using a PIV 2.4GHZ on an MSI board by the way.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on July 14, 2008, 10:30:49 AM
Boss, I just looked it up, and he's selling a PCMCIA card. I need one san for my PCI slot.

Ganun ba? I know it was a pci card... why not try contacting him to clarify.

Is it really impossible to work with a Via chipset? I'm using a PIV 2.4GHZ on an MSI board by the way.

Medyo touch and go ang mga via. It's usually dependent on the FW drivers kasi. The only way to find out is to try. Max out the track count during recording and see how far you can get with the via FW. RME have successfully used their Fireface with Via FW... who knows? Maybe Via got their drivers right this time and Maudio is more attuned to Via.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: x_taxi on July 14, 2008, 11:18:15 AM
you can always use the firewire off an old audigy card if you have one.  just don't install any of the creative drivers.  windows will always install drivers for the firewire chipset and it'll work even if you don't install the soundcard drivers.

some people at the digidesign forums have had more success with an audigy than some pci firewire cards.

 :-) :-) :-)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: notEworthy27 on August 01, 2008, 04:05:46 AM
sir, balak ko pong kumuha ng delta1010. I'm wondering whether it'll be wise to get a break-out box from m-audio or a mixer with direct outs would do?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: LouieAzcona on August 01, 2008, 05:59:39 PM
sir, balak ko pong kumuha ng delta1010. I'm wondering whether it'll be wise to get a break-out box from m-audio or a mixer with direct outs would do?

mixer with direct outs would do... ako nga mixerless eh... after 8 months of using delta1010lt, wala parin ako balak kumuha ng  mixer... una walang budget, pangalawa, hindi ko pa nararamdaman na kailangan ko na... siguro kapag puro condenser na ang mics ko (para sa acoustic drumkit), oras na bumili ng mixer.

i suggest, kunin mo muna yung delta1010, bago ka magdecide kung ano bibilhin. maganda mapagaralan mo muna. dati, muntik na ako bumili ng mixer,,, buti nalang madami ako nadiscover about sa m-audio.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: notEworthy27 on August 08, 2008, 06:15:03 PM
salamat sa reply! hmmm. Well, sooner or later i will be needing the mixer anyway for the condenser mics. so does this mean that the preamps of a mixer will be much better than the preamps of the m-audio break out box? sir pm niyo naman ako. I'd like to know more of your experiences. :)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: LouieAzcona on August 08, 2008, 06:43:02 PM
so does this mean that the preamps of a mixer will be much better than the preamps of the m-audio break out box?

hmmm. honestly, i dont know., i have not used those tools yet, . ill just pm you about what i know. haha.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: stilljey on August 08, 2008, 07:24:53 PM
standalone preamps is much better than preamp of a mixer or interface with built in preamp
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: LouieAzcona on August 09, 2008, 11:10:54 AM
standalone preamps is much better than preamp of a mixer or interface with built in preamp

what kind of "better" is that? kasi balak ko din bumili ng stand alone preamps eh
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: stilljey on August 10, 2008, 11:50:59 PM
what kind of "better" is that?
price range of $300-$500 preamp, dual or multi-channel depende sa needs mo. And if budget allow you can go for UA to Avalon, Presonus, Vintech, Grace...etc.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: titser_marco on August 13, 2008, 12:50:11 AM
More questions, KitC if you don't mind:

Win XP RAM question:

1. I've been reading that there's not much point in investing in more than 2GB RAM in an XP system, but some sites I've seen say that  the /3GB and/or /PAE switch can allow Windows to access the entire 4GB. What's the score [for audio, at least], really?

Page file question:

2. Should I put the page file on a separate drive, or put it in the fastest parts of a drive? I read some of your replies and you mentioned that it can be done using the right software. I'd appreciate guidance on this.

Cheers, chief!

BTW: MIDI's working real sweet now :)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on August 13, 2008, 08:51:04 AM
Win XP RAM question:

1. I've been reading that there's not much point in investing in more than 2GB RAM in an XP system, but some sites I've seen say that  the /3GB and/or /PAE switch can allow Windows to access the entire 4GB. What's the score [for audio, at least], really?

Gerard seems to be the master at this lately but here's the skiiny... Since XP is only 32-bit, it can only address a maximum of 4 Gb ram. From the MS Support site, they mention this:

Quote
Operating systems based on Microsoft® Windows NT® technologies have always provided applications with a flat 32-bit virtual address space that describes 4 gigabytes (GB) of virtual memory. The address space is usually split so that 2 GB of address space is directly accessible to the application and the other 2 GB is only accessible to the Windows executive software.

The /3Gb switch tells XP to let applications use more than 2 Gb, approx 3.2 Gb, leaving the rest for Windows.

For audio, having a lot of ram isn't that important for tracking. It only means you can have a lot of applications open simultaneously without windows having to access the swap file every now and then. This also means faster program access and switching since ram is faster than reading from disk. Ram does become important when you use a lot of virtual instruments - samplers are especially sensitive to ram and with libraries being several gigabytes in size, having sizable ram is a must (disk streaming is sometimes not fast enough if you need lots of polyphony).

If track count is a concern, however, faster hard disk access is more important, that's why it's often recommended that you defrag before every session.

Page file question:

2. Should I put the page file on a separate drive, or put it in the fastest parts of a drive? I read some of your replies and you mentioned that it can be done using the right software. I'd appreciate guidance on this.

Some people partition a small space on the system drive just to serve the swap file - something like 4 gigs will do since the swap file is often 1.5 times the size of your installed ram. At and above 2 gigs ram, however, the swap file becomes moot since your available ram is more than capable of handling most applictions (except for samplers as explained above). There are special partitioning software that can assign a specific space on the drive for the partition location; can't recall if it was Partition Magic or Paragon's partitioning soft.

Going back to our physics, the tangential speed of a disk is fastest at the outside edge of the platter. This means that data access should be fastest at the outer edge. By location a partition there and assigning it to the swap file, you can theoretically speed up hard disk access - this is only pertinent with the data in the swap file, though. Special defragmenting software (like Ultimate Defrag) locate your directories and the MFT (master file table) in the outer edge of the platter making data access faster. Bear in mind. also, that the rotation speeds also have a bearing on HD data throughput; a 7200 rpm disk will spew out data faster than a 5400 or 4200 rpm drive - that's why 10,000 rpm Raptors are so expensive.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: titser_marco on August 13, 2008, 12:09:17 PM
Gerard seems to be the master at this lately but here's the skiiny... Since XP is only 32-bit, it can only address a maximum of 4 Gb ram. From the MS Support site, they mention this:

The /3Gb switch tells XP to let applications use more than 2 Gb, approx 3.2 Gb, leaving the rest for Windows.

For audio, having a lot of ram isn't that important for tracking. It only means you can have a lot of applications open simultaneously without windows having to access the swap file every now and then. This also means faster program access and switching since ram is faster than reading from disk. Ram does become important when you use a lot of virtual instruments - samplers are especially sensitive to ram and with libraries being several gigabytes in size, having sizable ram is a must (disk streaming is sometimes not fast enough if you need lots of polyphony).


I see. Currently, I have a lot of VSTis [DSK Brass, GTG Drummer, DSK Strings, Guitar Rig 3, et al.] loaded in a project. Will more RAM mean better performance given these project specs?


If track count is a concern, however, faster hard disk access is more important, that's why it's often recommended that you defrag before every session.

Some people partition a small space on the system drive just to serve the swap file - something like 4 gigs will do since the swap file is often 1.5 times the size of your installed ram. At and above 2 gigs ram, however, the swap file becomes moot since your available ram is more than capable of handling most applictions (except for samplers as explained above). There are special partitioning software that can assign a specific space on the drive for the partition location; can't recall if it was Partition Magic or Paragon's partitioning soft.

Going back to our physics, the tangential speed of a disk is fastest at the outside edge of the platter. This means that data access should be fastest at the outer edge. By location a partition there and assigning it to the swap file, you can theoretically speed up hard disk access - this is only pertinent with the data in the swap file, though. Special defragmenting software (like Ultimate Defrag) locate your directories and the MFT (master file table) in the outer edge of the platter making data access faster. Bear in mind. also, that the rotation speeds also have a bearing on HD data throughput; a 7200 rpm disk will spew out data faster than a 5400 or 4200 rpm drive - that's why 10,000 rpm Raptors are so expensive.

Hmm, got it. Will a 7200 RPM drive be sufficient for my needs? I don't see my projects going beyond the 24-track mark. :) Will a SATA drive be siginificantly faster than an IDE drive, btw?

Thanks KitC!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on August 13, 2008, 06:12:49 PM
I see. Currently, I have a lot of VSTis [DSK Brass, GTG Drummer, DSK Strings, Guitar Rig 3, et al.] loaded in a project. Will more RAM mean better performance given these project specs?

Not really since most of the mentioned VSTIs aren't 'heavy hitters', ram-wise; you will find that having a fast processor is more important in this case. If you use a lot sample-based instruments (Kontakt, Halion, Gigasampler, EmulatorX...), this is where ram becomes very important.

Hmm, got it. Will a 7200 RPM drive be sufficient for my needs? I don't see my projects going beyond the 24-track mark. :) Will a SATA drive be siginificantly faster than an IDE drive, btw?

7200 rpm is quite sufficient, provided you are running at ATA-5 or even ATA-6 speeds. If your IDE HD controller is incapable of that (a rarity nowadays), you might have to upgrade your motherboard. SATA is quite faster than IDE. IDE has a theoretical maximum of 133 megabits per sec while SATA1 is at 150 mbps; SATA2 drives are rated at 300 mbps.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: titser_marco on August 13, 2008, 07:55:58 PM
I see. Thanks kit! By the way, what free drum sampler can you recommend? The GTG free drum sampler worked fine, but I found it limiting because i need more pads. Moreover, I don't think I'll be able to change the MIDI note assignments for each pad - which I need, considering that I need to sync it with my Alesis SR16 :)

Thanks again!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on August 14, 2008, 10:05:57 AM
I honestly don't know what free sampler to recommend since I've almost been exclusively using the VSTIs in Sonar, Cubase and Live, along with EmulatorX. You can try this though, SuperDrumFX (http://www.superdrumfx.com/index.php?site=download), Short Circuit (http://vemberaudio.se/shortcircuit.php), and Grizzly (http://www.majken.se/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=6&Itemid=9). Both SuperDrumFX and Grizzly have something like 8-10 pads, but Short Circuit is quite deep with lots of editing options and sample compatibility (it used to be paid software but is now unsupported freeware).
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: titser_marco on August 14, 2008, 10:24:17 AM
God, what would Philmusic do without Kit? Thanks uli, man!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: siore on August 14, 2008, 10:32:30 AM
Hey, I needed those too!  Thanks KitC.   :-D
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on August 14, 2008, 10:34:32 AM
Always a pleasure, guys!  :-D
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: titser_marco on August 14, 2008, 11:14:00 AM
Grabe, I never thought MIDI would be this much fun - and relatively affordable. :)

I just hope I can survive on a p4 system hehehe
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on August 14, 2008, 01:52:05 PM
Believe me, you can. My first "serious" DAW involved an Athlon 1700+ with 512 megs of ram, but it did house my Emu 1820m though.  :-D
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: titser_marco on August 16, 2008, 12:29:25 AM
Whooopeee there's hope!

KitC, mind sharing the programs [sequencers, samplers, audio editors, plugins] that you used when you had that set up? I'm thinking of using those in my p4 system until I have money for an upgrade. Thanks! :)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on August 19, 2008, 09:46:07 AM
Whooopeee there's hope!

KitC, mind sharing the programs [sequencers, samplers, audio editors, plugins] that you used when you had that set up?

Sequencers - Sonar 4, Cubase SL2
Sampler - EmulatorX 1.5
Audio Editor - Wavelab Lite
Plugins - almost every free stuff you can find, but I've been using digitalfishphones a lot.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: nolit on August 20, 2008, 12:39:25 AM
I have heard of monitor matrix from behringer and from samson (C Control). Both devices handles 3 stereo outputs from mixable 3 inputs.

My question is this. Since mastering employs checking the playability of a music on several hardwares, it is imperative to use several speakers. How can I feed an output from my soundcard to feed at least 4 devices where I can monitor how the music will play on several devices such as powered speakers, stereo component, line in on portable cassette players, etc. It would be best if you will have fader controls on each. This device sounds like the opposite of a mixer... where you have one signal source and feed to multiple outs. Getting an 8 bus mixer is expensive and a waste of those inputs as I only need the 8 outputs.

I am posting this question for a friend. Since I am using EMU 1820m with 4 monitor outs - this issue do not apply on me.  But I know a lot of people have  other soundcards and this may be a problem.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on August 20, 2008, 08:44:25 AM
This is where the monitor matrix like the C-Control comes in. It can route any input to any output, sometimes all 3 at the same time. At work, we use a Presonus Central Station; Mackie has the Big Knob which does the same thing.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: bindoy on August 20, 2008, 08:52:38 AM
This is where the monitor matrix like the C-Control comes in. It can route any input to any output, sometimes all 3 at the same time. At work, we use a Presonus Central Station; Mackie has the Big Knob which does the same thing.

haay matagal ko nang asam.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: melody_guitar on September 06, 2008, 04:21:51 PM
does anyone here knows the free downloadable software KRISTAL AUDIO ENGINE??.. does anyone here have tried and used it?? ako kasi eto yung main software na ginagamit ko for more than two years now.. but now, im studying the cakewalk 2.0 version.. reviews naman sa kristal audio engine guys kung meron man..salamat po ng marami....
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: pings15 on September 08, 2008, 09:58:06 PM
quick Q:

lets say i have a mixer..  how can i connect it through my PC?.. and use it as my soundcard?

will the pc detect how many I/O does it have?..



thanks!

(i think my question is related sa topic sorry pag hindi or pag may nakapagtanong na i cant use the search eh, im having these error messages (my internet is the problem) )
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jamming_papu on September 09, 2008, 12:18:52 AM
quick Q:

lets say i have a mixer..  how can i connect it through my PC?.. and use it as my soundcard?

will the pc detect how many I/O does it have?..

thanks!

(i think my question is related sa topic sorry pag hindi or pag may nakapagtanong na i cant use the search eh, im having these error messages (my internet is the problem) )

quick A.

i haven't see anyone did this. maybe you are referring to use the outs (like control, rca-line out, headphone out) of the mixer and directly plugging it to the 1/8" audio line in of your pc. i tried it myself in my own desktop and mixer. nothing happens.
im not sure why. (can anyone tell us why?  :-D)

anyways, if you like to connect your mixer to your pc then you should have a proper interface that would mediate between your analog sound signal to the digital language of your pc. behringer uca usb, Maudio 2496 are some stuff that can do this job. 8-)

however, some mixers are pc ready to record all the channels in their inputs and track them as separate tracks in a recording software. try looking for Alesis multimix usb and firewire in the net for example.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 09, 2008, 08:22:46 AM
quick A.

i haven't see anyone did this. maybe you are referring to use the outs (like control, rca-line out, headphone out) of the mixer and directly plugging it to the 1/8" audio line in of your pc. i tried it myself in my own desktop and mixer. nothing happens.
im not sure why. (can anyone tell us why?  :-D)

First, check your routings. You should connect the mixer out to the line in, which is usually blue in color - line outs begin at lime green. Next, make sure you have line in activated in the sound control panel. Unless that input is selected for recording, your software won't 'hear' anything. Lastly, if you are connecting the pc outs to your mixer's stereo input, be it tape in or a spare stereo strip, you might encounter feedback looping. Go to Tweakheadz.com and study the guides. There are several diagrams there on how to 'wire' your studio.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: Zazza on September 09, 2008, 05:19:53 PM
jose roberto,

Judging from your pc specs, you didn't mention a soundcard so I assume your pc has onboard sound. While you can record using onboard sound, remember that it is bound by the following limitations:

a. Not-so-great sound quality. Motherboards are built to a price specification and sound often takes a backseat  so don't expect high quality converters here. There will he higher noise levels and the line in usually doubles as part of the 5.1 or 7.1 output so operation of the inputs is a compromise.

b. Limited sample rate capability. It's either 44.1 or 48 kHz... 96 kHz? Forget it! Plus, if the mobo has s/pdif, it's almost always an output operating at 48 kHz ONLY.

c. Analog I/O is in 1/8" stereo jacks. Not the most robust of connections plus these are prone to component failures when repeatedly inserting and removing the plugs; this is due to the way the sockets are soldered onto the board. You can get around this by making a sort of 'breakout' extension cable that puts the strain of repeated removal and insertions (necessary when you have a lot of gear but only one pair of inputs) on the breakout. Some use a small mixer to act as a breakout.

That said, get a good soundcard if you want to sound better. Better yet, get a soundcard designed for audio recording. Soundblasters are a good place to start but are not really meant for serious recording, but will do for demos. The M-Audio brand is very good for recording and has a range to suit most budgets.

I'm not sure if you can plug your G1 direct since I can't find any reference to it on the net. I'm sure it was meant for direct connection to an amp; if it has a designated line out, you can plug that into your mixer/soundcard. If in doubt, use it's headphone connection instead, but watch out for levels!

To do a blow-by-blow here might make this post inordinately too long, but the short of it is to connect your signals to your inputs and to watch out for levels! If it's too loud, reduce volume at the source, not at the soundcard input. Another thing to consider is how you are monitoring (or listening) to what is coming into your soundcard; whats the point of recording if you can't hear it? Again, if you are still relying on onboard sound, remember the old computer axiom, G-I-G-O.

Sign up for the PC Recording workshop we have planned for the 9th. You might learn a trick or 2.



Sir Kit,

I highlighted the one above as my main question po. I plan to run an Athlon 64 system with 2gb DDR2 and 320g HDD, plus a Creative Audigy soundcard. Panu po ung "breakout" galing sa soundcard? And if that would be a small mixer, can you recommend a brand which is affordable po? I also plan to get KRK Studio monitors po. Dun ko ba ico-connect un sa mixer/breakout? Do i need a small mixer to get tha ball rollin' for my studio monitor speakers? Coz i also plan to mic my amp/guitar so a microphone looms too.

I'll record mostly guitar stuff, have no plans on MIDI yet. And besides getting a guitar USB input interface, what mostly do i need? I intend to get the KRK speakers pero I'm kinda lost in the setup process  :? Sorry i'm totally noob with recording setup process  :-D

Thanks in advance sir!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 09, 2008, 07:02:28 PM
I highlighted the one above as my main question po. I plan to run an Athlon 64 system with 2gb DDR2 and 320g HDD, plus a Creative Audigy soundcard. Panu po ung "breakout" galing sa soundcard? And if that would be a small mixer, can you recommend a brand which is affordable po? I also plan to get KRK Studio monitors po. Dun ko ba ico-connect un sa mixer/breakout? Do i need a small mixer to get tha ball rollin' for my studio monitor speakers? Coz i also plan to mic my amp/guitar so a microphone looms too.

Here's the thing... when starting out, you would want the simplest setup you can probably manage. I suggest sticking to a single audio interface, preferably a guitar usb interface. Come to terms with your equipment, then expand later as your skill grows. You may not even need the audigy if you choose the right usb interface. A good example is the Line6 Toneport UX1 which has both guitar and mic inputs. No need for a mixer; just add one as your needs grow. Start small, simple and inexpensive when learning.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: Zazza on September 09, 2008, 08:18:00 PM
Here's the thing... when starting out, you would want the simplest setup you can probably manage. I suggest sticking to a single audio interface, preferably a guitar usb interface. Come to terms with your equipment, then expand later as your skill grows. You may not even need the audigy if you choose the right usb interface. A good example is the Line6 Toneport UX1 which has both guitar and mic inputs. No need for a mixer; just add one as your needs grow. Start small, simple and inexpensive when learning.

Thanks for the input Sir!

About the studio monitors, do i still need them (sorry silly question i guess) or the Altecs and Philips 5.1 that i have preowned will suffice?

Cheers!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: xjepoyx on September 09, 2008, 09:21:07 PM
Thanks for the input Sir!

About the studio monitors, do i still need them (sorry silly question i guess) or the Altecs and Philips 5.1 that i have preowned will suffice?

Cheers!

If you're really plunging into this kind of hobby or profession... What you really need to invest first is your monitors....

I myself started with computer speakers... when i listened to my past recordings and mixes with my KRK's.... Haaaaaaaaayy grabe ang dami kong gs2ng baguhin!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: Zazza on September 09, 2008, 09:52:27 PM
If you're really plunging into this kind of hobby or profession... What you really need to invest first is your monitors....

I myself started with computer speakers... when i listened to my past recordings and mixes with my KRK's.... Haaaaaaaaayy grabe ang dami kong gs2ng baguhin!

Thanks for that Jepoy  :-D I think that nails it! Coz i felt that PC speakers ain't gonna cut it.

I'm gonna invest on the Line6 Toneport and a pair of KRKs or Samsons that'll fit my budget.

Cheers!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: xjepoyx on September 09, 2008, 09:57:24 PM
Thanks for that Jepoy  :-D I think that nails it! Coz i felt that PC speakers ain't gonna cut it.

I'm gonna invest on the Line6 Toneport and a pair of KRKs or Samsons that'll fit my budget.

Cheers!

AFAIK may clearance sale ang TMS on KRK Speakers also AP has a clearance sale. Try to contact forerunnertech re: KRKs and Tarkuz re: Samson Monitors
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: jamming_papu on September 10, 2008, 12:32:52 AM
First, check your routings. You should connect the mixer out to the line in, which is usually blue in color - line outs begin at lime green. ...

thanks for the answer sir kit. with some clicks in my pc's control panel, napagana ko yung from rca line outs of mixer to 1/8" line in of pc. however, level and sound read by the pc was quite bad. well, what would i expect of a stock soundcard which is built-in on the motherboard?  :-D

as long as my M-audio 2496 works, im in and still good on my recordings.  8-)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 10, 2008, 08:01:29 AM
what would i expect of a stock soundcard which is built-in on the motherboard?  :-D

There are some onboard audio that sound good when properly routed. The old Nvidia mobos with soundstream were quite good for their time. My previous mobo, K7N2 Delta had optical outs that I routed into my 1820m - did that so I can play the occasional game using onboard sound so that the directx drivers didn't fudge up the Emu's settings and my DAW's asio configuration. At one time I even had digital coax out from my DSP Factory going into the EMu as well! It made for some interesting routings.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: titser_marco on September 10, 2008, 09:31:54 PM
Hi!

I finally got the Delta 44! Whooohoo!

Next question:

I currently run a 2.4 GHz P4 system with 1GB of RAM. Now, a friend is selling a mobo and processor package that contains an LGA 775 mobo and a Celeron D 3 GHz processor. My question is will that upgrade result in a significantly faster and more capable system? I know that this upgrade will eventually allow me upgrade higher end processors, but I'd like to know if I could work with more speed with this Celeron unit.

Also, would it be wise to get a dual core processor for this mobo eventually?  Will a 2.0 GHz dual core processor be faster than a 3.0 GHz Celeron D? Thanks!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 11, 2008, 08:21:02 AM
Celerons are usually P4s with smaller caches; this sometimes has an impact on performance. Surprisingly, there was a mobile celeron that outperformed the same speed P4; these were based on the Sonoma laptop chipset.

Check your mobo for dual core compatibility first. Newer cpus coming out are now based on the 45 nm process and some mobos/chipsets are incompatible with those.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 11, 2008, 08:21:10 AM
Celerons are usually P4s with smaller caches; this sometimes has an impact on performance. Surprisingly, there was a mobile celeron that outperformed the same speed P4; these were based on the Sonoma laptop chipset.

Check your mobo for dual core compatibility first. Newer cpus coming out are now based on the 45 nm process and some mobos/chipsets are incompatible with those.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: titser_marco on September 11, 2008, 09:10:19 AM
Got it, Kit! Buti na lang the guy still has the manuals for this unit. Another bonus I guess is the fact that it's still in its housing so I can run the two systems in parallel and see which is faster. Thanks again Kit!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: titser_marco on September 12, 2008, 10:11:49 PM
Ok another set of noob questions:

Hard Drive Allocation:

Okay, so I have the following drives:

1 x Seagate 120 GB SATA
1 x Maxtor 40GB SATA
1 x Seagate 120 GB IDE
1 x Seagate 40 GB IDE

So how should I partition these?

Where do I put the following:

OS and apps
VST plugins
Samples
Audio Project Data
Swap File
Other files [Mp3s, other docs]

Power Supply Question:

How many watts and amperes would I need to support this system:

1 x P4 2.4 GHz
4 x DDR400 RAM
1 x Seagate 120 GB SATA
1 x Maxtor 40GB SATA
1 x Seagate 120 GB IDE
1 x Seagate 40 GB IDE
1 x ATI Radeon Video Card
1 x IDE DVD ROM
1 x IDE DVD / CD Writer
2 x PCI Delta 44 Soundcard
1 x PCI SoundBlaster MIDI interface
1 x USB to MIDI Controller
1 x Processor Fan
3 x Casing Fans

Thanks!
 
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 13, 2008, 12:53:08 AM
Considering that many drives, I'd go 500 watts, but make sure to use PSU's capable of delivering 380 watts of 'real' power. Look for reviews on available power supplies and try to get the ones that could deliver.

As for your drives, I question why you should have two 40 Gb drives. OTOH, you could have a dual boot system with one dedicated purely for audio and the other for everyday use. You could also house one of them in an enclosure to serve as mobile storage.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: titser_marco on September 13, 2008, 02:14:48 AM
Considering that many drives, I'd go 500 watts, but make sure to use PSU's capable of delivering 380 watts of 'real' power. Look for reviews on available power supplies and try to get the ones that could deliver.

As for your drives, I question why you should have two 40 Gb drives. OTOH, you could have a dual boot system with one dedicated purely for audio and the other for everyday use. You could also house one of them in an enclosure to serve as mobile storage.

re: 40 GB Drives - Got them because they were given to me. I agree with you on the eventually going the mobile storage direction, esp. when I get enough cash to invest in bigger storage. :)

Btw, Kit, how do I know if it can deliver REAL 380w of power? I currently have a 500w PSU on my system.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 13, 2008, 10:40:53 AM
Btw, Kit, how do I know if it can deliver REAL 380w of power? I currently have a 500w PSU on my system.

My cousin operates a computer gaming shop (my brother spec'ed out all individual components) and we noticed that it was the generic power supplies that keep giving out, usually with blown caps. It may say 500w on the cover, but the quality of power was way, way below what it could deliver. Most of the branded psu's here like Coolermaster, HEC, Enermax and Silverstone usually deliver in terms of power, but I still go on the net to check reviews on them.

For ex., I presently use a Coolermaster Real Power Pro 550W to power my quad core rig - reviews have given it good ratings in terms of sustained power, especially in the 12V rails which is important for those drives and other peripheral. My other rig (Athlon64 3700+) is powered by a HEC 480W, another proven psu.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: titser_marco on September 14, 2008, 12:51:42 AM
Thanks Kit! By the way, what allocation scheme do you suggest given the drives that I have? [Drives are listed in my original post] :)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 14, 2008, 10:17:54 AM
Thanks Kit! By the way, what allocation scheme do you suggest given the drives that I have? [Drives are listed in my original post] :)

Definitely use the 40 gigs as system drives. The other larger drives should be used for data and audio. If you have a lot of samples, you can dedicate one drive for that. One more thing, remember that dvd and cd drives are usually IDE; it's a good thing that a couple of the drives are sata - try to use the 40 gig ide seagate as the system drive since most P4 mobos prefer to boot from ide.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: maniacally_cool on September 21, 2008, 10:27:56 PM
just acquired a laptop last summer.
wanted to start recording with it so i went here to get some pointers.

sigh......23 pages of "backreading"   hehehe. :-D




Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: karlo on September 22, 2008, 06:13:03 PM
If you're really plunging into this kind of hobby or profession... What you really need to invest first is your monitors....

I myself started with computer speakers... when i listened to my past recordings and mixes with my KRK's.... Haaaaaaaaayy grabe ang dami kong gs2ng baguhin!

Any Four Tet fans out there? It's amazing how four tet does all of his great tracks at home on his crap Dell PC using cheapo hi-fi speakers as monitors... He said something about knowing every sonic quirk of his speakers so he didn't really need studio monitors. I don't have good monitors myself (can't afford them- it just seems more cost-effective to the cash-strapped musician to plunk down on other things) so this is really inspiring to me. A very punk-rock way of going about it if I may say so. He had an interesting soundonsound article that can be googled where he discusses his "studio"

Plus, i love how he uses really old cakewalk music studio software, audiomulch, and cool edit pro for everything. Shows how even the most guerilla music gear can be used to great effect.

Jonesing for those tannoys and that hafler on the classifieds tho... If you've been listening to music on a pair of speakers for ten years, would getting dedicated studio monitors make that big a difference to justify the outlay? I'm not looking to earn money from my tracks anytime soon.

Also, without getting into the benefits of a more systematized and disaster-proof computer setup, are the performance (i.e. speed and stability) gains of hard drive partitioning even noticeable?

Ya, and another Q I have is about the expected lifespan of an external hard drive. Do these really have an expiration date, and if so, what is the best backup/recovery scheme to protect our precious production data? Would prolonged non-use affect this in any way?
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on September 23, 2008, 08:23:04 AM
If you've been listening to music on a pair of speakers for ten years, would getting dedicated studio monitors make that big a difference to justify the outlay? I'm not looking to earn money from my tracks anytime soon.

I used to mix on some Altec Lansings way, way back. The mixes would usually translate as boomy on other systems no matter what I did. Apparently the Altecs had a substantial dip in the crossover frequency where the sub kicked in - this was the cause of my problems. Moving to a pair of inexpensive Fostex monitors solved my problems with bass.

Also, without getting into the benefits of a more systematized and disaster-proof computer setup, are the performance (i.e. speed and stability) gains of hard drive partitioning even noticeable?

Better to have a separate drive for audio. Imagine having the OS on one partition and audio on a separate partition on the same drive... can you imagine the work the drive heads have to do in order to keep up with multiple tracks of audio while still accessing system files and the swap file simultaneously?

Ya, and another Q I have is about the expected lifespan of an external hard drive. Do these really have an expiration date, and if so, what is the best backup/recovery scheme to protect our precious production data? Would prolonged non-use affect this in any way?

The only safe answer is redundancy... on separate drives and/or writable media. That is my worry now... imagine having to find backup solutions for 3 terabytes of data.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: x_taxi on September 23, 2008, 07:42:52 PM
scoring used to be a hobby for me.  i started monitorin on a sony boombox and a sb live.  haha.  my mixes lacked bass so i compensated for it.  when my boombox died, i started to use an atp3 altec lansing.  i just monitored on everythin else as well.  like the car, ipod or home stereo.

gettin a proper set of monitors saves you time though.  it'll let you take on more work less the hassle of bad mixes.

 :-) :-) :-)
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: Kclan on September 25, 2008, 05:40:26 PM
very informative thread. nice



 :mrgreen:
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: karlo on September 26, 2008, 02:08:47 PM
scoring used to be a hobby for me.  i started monitorin on a sony boombox and a sb live.  haha.  my mixes lacked bass so i compensated for it.  when my boombox died, i started to use an atp3 altec lansing.  i just monitored on everythin else as well.  like the car, ipod or home stereo.

 :-) :-) :-)

A lot of people actually do recommend the car test as an essential part of monitoring. Monitoring on the iPod with its tinny earbuds? :-D
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: x_taxi on September 26, 2008, 04:33:44 PM
A lot of people actually do recommend the car test as an essential part of monitoring. Monitoring on the iPod with its tinny earbuds? :-D

yup!  if it sounds good in 128bit mp3 format with the very bad stock ipod earbuds, then it must be good!

 :-D :-D :-D
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: Zazza on October 03, 2008, 09:30:17 AM
man this thread is heaven sent  :-D learning a lot from it big time!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: gutz_3110 on October 03, 2008, 11:33:12 PM
Sir KitC salamat sa reply mo sa PM!

im still reading the thread pa...and learning!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: Gibson78 on October 15, 2008, 11:01:06 PM
Hi, sorry if this is OT or not - I did'nt want to create a new thread. :|

I recently upgraded my PC, it's now running Vista, using my onboard soundcard (Realtek HD Audio), and I just installed the latest Asio (2.8) and Guitar Rig 3

Ok, when I choose Asio for the audio setup, nothing happens - no audio and  input device box, when I choose Direct Sound, same problem - no audio but it has all the choices (latency, sample. I/O etc).

I can hear my guitar sound through the speakers - it just doesn't pass through Guitar Rig 3 at all. Looking at the interface, there isnt even the tiniest blip on the Inputs. I can't even play drum tracks when using ASIO, I can play the same tracks using Direct Sound, but no audio at all (I see the meter going).

Anyone else has this problem? I think it's a driver problem with Realtek HD Audio, I just don't have the time to re-install Windows XP and AC97 drivers to check if it really is. I really don't want to go out now and buy a separate soundcard, because I really can't be bothered right now.

Hope you guys can help.

Cheers and Beers!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on October 16, 2008, 08:16:45 AM
@Gibson78 - three things are compounding your problem... Vista, asio, and realtek. For one thing, Realtek doesn't support asio. Second, Vista and asio don't seem to go well together. You can try using WDM/WaveRT/WASAPI drivers if Realtek has developed any but that's a longshot. An officemate of mine had me look over a new laptop with Vista installed... we couldn't get asio working and resorted to WDM only.

Solutions? Either revert to XP or get a real soundcard with Vista drivers. FYI, I'm still using WinXP SP2.
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: Gibson78 on October 16, 2008, 02:13:32 PM
I knew it. I guess I'll just have to breakdown and get a new soundcard / audio interface. Any suggestions?

Thanks!
Title: Re: Setting up your PC for Recording
Post by: KitC on October 17, 2008, 08:01:07 AM
I knew it. I guess I'll just have to breakdown and get a new soundcard / audio interface. Any suggestions?

Try looking at the M-Audio USB or firewire offerings at JB. If your inclinations are toward guitar recording as well, I suggest the Line6 Toneport or UX series over at Yupangco. In a pinch, the Behringer UCA can work, but I'm not so sure over